Tips & Tricks for Flying with the Garmin GFC 500 AFCS Autopilot, Part 2

Tips & Tricks for Flying with the Garmin GFC 500 AFCS Autopilot, Part 2

In the last article, we left off with our shiny new Garmin GFC 500 autopilot fully configured for departure. We’d been instructed to “fly heading 180, climb and maintain 3,000 feet.” 

Takeoff: From runway to airborne

With the preflight work done, take off as normal. Saying “Gear up, flaps up, yaw damper on,” will make you feel like one of the big kids, as you press the “YD” key and let the servos handle the rudder. Above 800 feet agl with the airplane cleaned up, reach over and enable the autopilot by pressing the “AP” button whenever you’re ready.

If on a GPS direct track for the first leg, I’ll press Direct To-Enter-Enter on my navigator first, to recenter the course from the present position, then press the “AP” button to engage the autopilot.

George is now flying the airplane…or is he?

Important: Develop this habit! Whenever you select a new mode on the autopilot, always bring your eyes back to the top of your G5 or G3X and verify the modes selected. Every. Single. Time.

I developed this habit shortly after finding myself in the clouds on a departure, thinking George was flying—very poorly, I might add, and my scan was confirming that—and then discovering that nobody had been flying the plane for about 60 seconds. Talk about a wake-up call!

The correct lateral/vertical modes were selected, but the autopilot itself hadn’t enabled. Maybe I didn’t quite push the button while getting bounced around in those Houston afternoon thermals. Verify the modes! Some people call it “checking the scoreboard,” with the “scoreboard” being the autopilot status line at the top of your PFD.

Do you have green AP and YD annunciations on the scoreboard? No? Fix that! Yes? OK, then George is flying. But what is he doing? Verify the annunciated lateral and vertical modes. It’s showing a green IAS 90? Great, George is flying you at an indicated airspeed of 90 knots. Or is he? Cross-check! Is that what your airspeed indicators read? Great.

Where will George level off? Check to see that the cyan altitude bug is set at your expected level off altitude (did tower give you a last-minute change?), and that a white (armed) ALTS mode is annunciated next to the IAS 90. If so, “George” will level off at that ALTitude Selected.

I can’t stress this enough—always “check the scoreboard” after doing anything on the GMC 507. Every. Single. Time.

 

Fair warning. You’re going to be bored.

The GFC 500 is going to do such a fine job flying the airplane that you’ll find you get bored, unless you fill that time with other activities. Of course, I’m not suggesting you read a book or get caught up on Netflix! You now have time to focus on other important pilot duties.

Check the weather ahead and develop options. Refine your Plan B if needed. Scan those engine instruments more often. Check out the approach plates and arrival airport diagram. Which runway are they using? What taxiway do you think you could make, and what taxi route to your FBO makes sense?

It’s amazing the amount of “thinking time” you get back with a well-running autopilot as your co-pilot. But don’t get so busy you forget to monitor George frequently!

Tip/trick: While in NAV mode, tracking that GPS course, reach over every few minutes and push the “HDG/TRK” knob on the GMC 507 to sync the heading bug to your current heading. The difference between the heading bug and your actual track, as shown on the HSI, will give you a good idea of the winds aloft, and how they are changing over time.

If you have a GAD 13 installed and the recent G5/G3X firmware, you’ll see winds aloft and OAT displayed on the instruments. Having that heading bug already synced up is especially helpful when ATC says, “Turn 10 degrees right for traffic.” Note the current bugged heading, spin it right 10, then reach over and press “HDG” on the GMC 507. What’s next? You know: Check the scoreboard. Every. Single. Time.

 

What’s this VNAV thing?

Vertical navigation can be thought of as a magenta path, not over the ground, but rather through the vertical profile. It is a GPS-computed path to help you meet the step-downs in a “descend via” clearance on an arrival procedure, to help you with that crossing restriction ATC just gave you, or to ensure you get from your cruising altitude to pattern altitude 3 miles before you arrive at your destination airport.

The “VNAV” button on your GMC 507 enables the autopilot to fly that vertical path precisely—all you must do once it’s engaged is manage the throttle to keep your airspeed where you want it. But there’s the catch: “once it’s engaged.” There are some gotchas that trip people up and keep VNAV from working when expected.

First, you need your GFC 500 system to be coupled to an IFR navigator capable of VNAV. The GTN 650 and 750 are two such navigators. If you’re flying a GNS 430/530 series, even if it’s WAAS enabled, you’re out of luck. The 430/530 units do have a vertical descent planner that can tell you the VSR (vertical speed required) to meet a defined crossing restriction, and I use that feature—but it won’t couple to that fancy “VNAV” button on the GFC 500 autopilot.

If you’re flying a GTN series navigator, though, and load a procedure that has crossing restrictions or add your altitude constraints to your flight plan, then VNAV should be available on the GFC 500.

Second, to activate VNAV, you must perform certain steps in order. The most often missed step is that you must set your selected altitude (ALT SEL) to a lower altitude than you’re currently flying.

Here’s a scenario. You’re at 9,000 feet msl, and your flight plan says you want to be at 3,000 feet msl at GOTHI intersection, and your MFD properly shows a TOD (top of descent) and BOD (bottom of descent), and the “VNAV” button is lit up on the GMC 507, and you hear that voice that announces, “VERTICAL TRACK,” one minute before the descent begins. All of this looks good!

But the airplane will remain at 9,000 feet and never actually descend, flying right past your TOD marker and remaining at your current altitude, if you leave that selected altitude bug on the G5/G3X set to your current 9,000 feet.

Why? Think of it this way: the autopilot will always err on the high side to avoid flying you lower than you want. If you want to descend lower, you must set the selected altitude lower than the altitude you’re currently flying.

Tip/trick: If you want to use VNAV, set up the altitude profile in your navigator’s flight plan. Verify you see the TOD/BOD markers on your moving map. One minute before descent, you’ll hear that nice lady’s voice in your headset announcing “VERTICAL TRACK.” That’s your cue!

You’re going to do three things after that audible prompt:

Set the ALT SEL bug to the lowest altitude you’ve been cleared to by ATC, or the lowest altitude in the published arrival procedure.

Press the “VNAV” button on the autopilot.

Check the scoreboard! Every. Single. Time.

Several other factors determine if VNAV will engage or not, such as the requirement to be navigating on a course (i.e., direct to a fix, or between two waypoints). If you’re just wandering around on your own, VNAV isn’t an option.

Garmin recently published a 20-minute training video that thoroughly covers all aspects of VNAV training. If you fly with a navigator capable of doing VNAV, I strongly recommend you take the time to view it.

 

Some final tips

  • Pressing the “AP” button before selecting lateral or vertical modes will activate the Flight Director (FD) and engage the autopilot in the default PIT (pitch) and ROL (roll wings level) modes. That’s probably not a mode set that you will ever really want, so always select your desired lateral/vertical modes before pressing the “AP” button.
  • If lateral/vertical modes are selected, but the autopilot and flight director are not engaged, you can engage the FD separately from the autopilot by pressing the “FD” button, and then hand-fly to match the flight director’s cues. Pressing the “AP” button enables both the autopilot and FD since the autopilot works by following the flight director’s commands.
  • If, while climbing or descending, ATC tells you to level off immediately, simply reach over and press the “ALT” button twice. It will grab your current altitude and lock onto it.
  • If you find your ALT hold is off by 20-40 feet, using the pitch trim wheel on the GMC 507 while ALT mode is engaged, will change the selected altitude reference UP or DN in 10-foot increments. Utilizing this method, you can tweak your altitude by up to 200 feet. If you need to “tweak” your altitude by more than 200 feet, you’re really “changing” your altitude, so just dial in a new selected altitude and use another vertical mode (VS, IAS, or PIT) to make that change. If ATC gives you a new barometer setting, setting the new value on the G5/G3X is all you need to do. The autopilot will seek up or down a few feet to capture your selected altitude at the new pressure level.
  • GA (Go Around) mode is great! You’re allowed to use the autopilot down to 200 feet on an approach (which is the only exception to the STC’s “don’t use the autopilot below 800 feet AGL” limitation). When you get to your missed approach point or decision height and don’t have the runway environment in sight, push the throttle forward and let that index finger reach forward to touch the “GO AROUND” button as you do the rest of your gear/flaps cleanup. Your PFD will command a pitch up and straight-ahead climb, and the autopilot will immediately follow that guidance. Once the initial part of the go-around procedure is completed (which may be a straight-ahead climb to a specific altitude before making any turns), unsuspend your IFR navigator to resume waypoint sequencing, and select the appropriate lateral/vertical modes on the GFC 500. The autopilot will fly the entire missed procedure, including holds. Practice this in VMC first!
  • If you change navigation sources (i.e., toggle your navigator from GPS to VLOC), the autopilot will sense this, and the lateral mode will revert to ROL (wings level, it doesn’t even hold a heading). Thus, anytime you do any work on the navigator, do your scoreboard check afterward. Switching from GPS to a LOC or ILS course will require you to reselect the appropriate lateral mode. Speaking of which…
  • On an approach, should you use APR or NAV mode? The answer is easy: If the approach you’re flying has vertical guidance (think ILS, LPV, LNAV+V, or LNAV/VNAV), then use APR mode. If the approach you are flying doesn’t have vertical guidance (think LOC, VOR, or a BC approach), then use NAV mode. You can select either mode (NAV or APR) as soon as ATC has cleared you for the approach. You’ll see a green HDG for active mode, and a white annunciation for the armed mode.
  • Related to the last tip: one time, ATC had me on a vector (HDG mode) to intercept the GPS LPV approach, and I had APR mode armed. Shortly before intercept, ATC told me they were going to fly me through the course and then bring me back for sequencing purposes. If this happens to you, you’ll need to reach over and disable the armed approach by pressing the “APR” button to deselect the mode. This will leave HDG mode as the only active lateral mode and allow you to follow the controller’s vectors. Once inbound to the approach course again, reactive the approach by pressing “APR.” If you fail to deselect/deactivate the approach mode once it’s armed, the autopilot will turn you inbound, which is not what the controller told you to expect or do.
  • GPS approaches (especially LPV) are the simplest approach to fly with the GFC 500. If you have the option, choose it. There’s no mode to change when inbound, simply press “APR” when you get close, outside the FAF, and have been cleared for the approach. That’s it. Other approach types involve more button-pushing. Get out the flight manual supplement, grab a buddy in VMC, and go practice the detailed step-by-step in the manual until it is ingrained in your subconscious. IMC is not the place to figure things out.

 

I hope you found these tips helpful. The GFC 500 is an amazing piece of equipment, but as with all things in aviation, it demands respect for its capabilities and its limitations. Learn both well, practice before doing it for real, and leverage its ability to make your flying safer.

 

Taking Off and Going Around

The first phase of flight is just getting airborne and away from the ground on runway heading to 400 feet agl before making any turns, especially when IFR. The GFC 500 can help you there, too. Simply press the GO AROUND button, probably installed near your throttle, and the GFC 500’s flight director command bars will command a straight out wings-level climb at an appropriate pitch attitude, as specified by your aircraft make and model’s STC, and the lateral/vertical modes annunciated on your G5 or G3X Touch will both indicate “TO” for “takeoff.” 

Tip/trick: The same GO AROUND button also commands the pitch bars for a go-around at the start of a missed approach, and you’ll see the lateral and vertical modes annunciated as “GA.” How does the same button handle both “TO” and “GA”? If you’re not flying (i.e., your groundspeed is slower than 30 knots), the system knows you’re setting up for TO (takeoff); if you are flying, then you must want to GA (go around). Boy, this system is smart!

Tip/trick: Use of the “TO” mode is optional. I might use it for positive flight director guidance when departing into a very low overcast, but if the ceiling is at least 800 feet agl (the minimum autopilot engagement altitude), I actually find it easier to preselect my NAV/HDG and IAS values and modes, and just fly straight ahead on runway heading, ignoring any turn the flight director command bars are providing cues for, during that first phase of flight. It reduces workload a little, as my only task then becomes pressing the AP button at 800 feet agl—lateral and vertical modes/values were already set on the ground.

 

Troy Whistman is the father of three grown daughters and has been married 30 years to his lovely redhead bride, affectionately called “Lady Red.” Together, they base their airplane at the Mid-Way Regional Airport (KJWY) south of Dallas, Texas. Whistman holds a commercial airplane SEL certificate with instrument airplane rating. When not flying for fun to catch a sunrise or sunset, he enjoys using his toys as tools to help others: he flies for and is on the board of directors for Angel Flight South Central, and thinks flying kids for Challenge Air is some of the most rewarding flying he does. Send questions or comments to .

Part 1 of this series can be found here: Tips & Tricks for Flying with the Garmin GFC 500 AFCS Autopilot, Part 1

 

RESOURCES

CFA Supporter

Garmin
 
Garmin GFC 500 Manuals
 
Garmin VNAV Tutorial

 

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 Garmin receives approval for the GFC 500 autopilot in the Cessna 180/185

 Garmin receives approval for the GFC 500 autopilot in the Cessna 180/185

April 24, 2019 – Garmin is pleased to announce it has received FAA Supplemental Type Certification (STC) for the GFC 500 autopilot in the Cessna 180/185.

 Intended for piston single-engine aircraft, the GFC 500 delivers superior in-flight characteristics, self-monitoring capabilities and minimal maintenance needs when compared to older generation autopilot systems.

Specific aircraft models approved for the GFC 500 autopilot include:

• Cessna 180 – Models 180, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, J, K

• Cessna 185 – Models 185, A, B, C, D, E, A185E, A185F

The GFC 500 autopilot uniquely integrates with the G5 electronic flight instrument or a combination of both the G5 and G500 TXi flight display to provide pilots with an economical and modern autopilot solution.

The autopilot mode controller contains large dedicated keys and knobs, a control wheel that allows for easy adjustments to aircraft pitch, airspeed and vertical speed and a level button that returns the aircraft to straight-and-level flight.

As a standard feature, pilots receive Garmin ESP with the GFC 500 autopilot, which works to assist the pilot in maintaining the aircraft in a stable flight condition. ESP functions independently of the autopilot and works in the background to help pilots avoid inadvertent flight attitudes or bank angles and provide airspeed protection while the pilot is hand-flying the aircraft.

In addition to traditional autopilot capabilities such as altitude hold, vertical speed and heading modes, the GFC 500 also includes:

• Premium functions and advanced capabilities such as altitude pre-select and indicated airspeed hold mode.

• Pilots can fly fully coupled descent Vertical Navigation (VNAV) profiles throughout the enroute and terminal phases of flight with a GTN 750/650 navigator.

• Pilots can select, couple and fly various instrument approaches, including GPS, ILS, VOR, LOC and back course approaches.

• Built-in GPS roll steering capability eliminates the need for external roll steering converters, allowing for smoother navigation tracking when installed with a compatible navigator.

• Level Mode, which automatically engages the autopilot to restore the aircraft to straight and level flight.

• Underspeed protection helps prevent the pilot from stalling the aircraft.

• Overspeed protection helps prevent the pilot from exceeding aircraft maximum speed (VNE).

• Pilots can fly coupled “go-arounds” during missed approach sequencing. A remotely-installed go-around button commands the Flight Director to display the appropriate pitch attitude required for the missed approach procedure and activates a loaded missed approach when paired with a GTN 650/750 navigator.

• An optional pitch-trim servo adds automatic trim and manual electric trim.

• With the addition of an optional yaw damper servo, Yaw Damping (YD) mode minimizes yawing oscillations while also helping to maintain coordinated flight by keeping the slip/skid indicator centered.

For customers who already have a G5 electronic flight instrument, the GFC 500 starts at a suggested retail price of $6,9951 for a 2-axis autopilot.

The GFC 500 can be purchased with the G5 electronic flight instrument for a suggested retail price of less than $10,0001.

Garmin continues to broaden its aircraft approval list for the GFC 600 and GFC 500 autopilots.

To view the most up-to-date aircraft STC list, to view certifications that are expected to begin in the next 12 months or to express interest in a specific aircraft make/model, visit garmin.com/GFC500 or www.garmin.com/GFC600.

For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to garmin.com/aviation.

 

 

1 Installation not included.

 

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Garmin Announces Additional Aviation Webinars

Garmin Announces Additional Aviation Webinars

Garmin is pleased to announce aviation webinars through June of 2019. Ranging from Garmin Pilot tips and tricks, cost-effective autopilot upgrades to low-cost avionics solutions, these free webinars offer pilots and customers with a broad overview of the latest Garmin has to offer, while also providing a general operational overview of its vast product line.

Autopilot Retrofits

The GFC 500 and GFC 600 retrofit autopilots offer reduced maintenance, as well as safety-enhancing capabilities such as Garmin Electronic Stability Protection (ESP), underspeed/overspeed protection and coupled approaches. This webinar focuses on the features and benefits of both autopilots.

Advanced Avionics Upgrades

A wide variety of avionics upgrades including the TXi series touchscreen flight displays, GTN series navigators, GMA audio panels, GTX ADS-B transponders, autopilots and more provide aircraft owners with endless panel upgrade options.

ADS-B Solutions for Business Aviation

This webinar focuses on a variety of Garmin ADS-B solutions available for a wide range of business jets on the market. Cost-effective solutions are currently available for some of the most popular business aircraft in the industry, including the Citation II/SII, Citation V, Learjet 20/30/60 and more. 

Garmin Pilot

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Garmin GFC 500 & GFC 600 Autopilots Approved for Additional Aircraft Models

Garmin GFC 500 & GFC 600 Autopilots Approved for Additional Aircraft Models

November 14, 2018 - Garmin is pleased to announce it has received Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Supplemental Type Certification (STC) in several aircraft models for the GFC 500 and GFC 600 autopilots. The GFC 500 and GFC 600 deliver superior in-flight characteristics, self-monitoring capabilities and minimal maintenance needs when compared to older generation autopilot systems. The GFC 500 is intended for single-engine piston aircraft, while the GFC 600 is intended for high performance piston single/twin-engine and turbine aircraft that have a wide range of speed and performance characteristics.

New aircraft models approved for the GFC 500 autopilot include:

• Cessna 210

o Models: 210K, T210K, 210L, T210L, 210M, T210M, 210N, T210N

New aircraft models approved for the GFC 600 autopilot include:

• Cessna 208B (cargo pod-equipped only)

The GFC 500 autopilot uniquely integrates with the G5 electronic flight instrument or a combination of both the G5 electronic flight instrument and the G500 TXi or G500 flight displays to provide pilots with an economical and modern autopilot solution. The GFC 600 is designed as a standalone autopilot and also boasts superior integration potential when paired with the G500 TXi/G600 TXi or G500/G600 glass flight displays, Garmin navigators, as well as a variety of third-party flight displays, instruments and navigation sources.

 

The full-featured GFC 600 and GFC 500 autopilots provide thousands of existing general aviation aircraft with a simple, light-weight, cost-effective autopilot upgrade path. The GFC 600 and GFC 500 incorporate solid state attitude with robust self-monitoring capabilities to provide superior autopilot performance, greater reliability and safety benefits that are similar to the popular GFC 700 autopilot. In addition to traditional autopilot capabilities such as altitude hold, vertical speed and heading modes, the GFC 600 and GFC 500 also include altitude preselect, VNAV1, Level Mode, underspeed and overspeed protection and more. Pilots can also select, couple and fly various instrument approaches, including GPS, ILS, VOR, LOC and back course approaches when paired with a compatible GPS navigator.

As a standard feature on both the GFC 500 and GFC 600 autopilots, pilots receive Garmin Electronic Stability and Protection (ESP), which works to assist the pilot in maintaining the aircraft in a stable flight condition. ESP functions independently of the autopilot and works in the background to help pilots avoid inadvertent flight attitudes or bank angles and provides airspeed protection while the pilot is hand-flying the aircraft.

For customers who already have a G5 electronic flight instrument, the GFC 500 starts at a suggested retail price of $6,9952 for a 2-axis autopilot. The GFC 600 autopilot is available for a suggested retail price of $19,9952 for a 2-axis autopilot with electric pitch trim. Garmin continues to add additional aircraft models to the growing STC list for the GFC 500 and GFC 600 autopilots. To view the most up-to-date aircraft STC list, to view certifications that are expected to begin in the next 12-months, or to express interest in a specific aircraft make/model, visit: www.garmin.com/GFC500 or www.garmin.com/GFC600.

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Garmin Announces Year-End Aviation Webinars

Garmin Announces Year-End Aviation Webinars

October 31, 2018 - Garmin is pleased to announce the addition of several aviation webinars through the end of the year. Ranging from Garmin Pilot tips and tricks, cost-effective autopilot upgrades to low-cost avionics solutions, these free webinars offer pilots and customers with a broad overview of the latest Garmin has to offer, while also providing a general operational overview of its vast product line.

Autopilot Retrofits The GFC 500 and GFC 600 retrofit autopilots offer reduced maintenance, as well as safety- enhancing capabilities such as Garmin Electronic Stability Protection (ESP), underspeed/overspeed protection and coupled approaches. This webinar focuses on the features and benefits of both autopilots.

• Cost-effective Retrofit Autopilot Solutions, November 13th @ 7:00 PM CT

Low-cost Avionics Solutions Learn about upgrading an aircraft panel with cost-effective avionics such as the GDL 82 ADS- B Out datalink, the GTX 345 series all-in-one ADS-B transponders and the G5 electronic flight instrument.

• Low-cost ADS-B, Instruments & Avionics, November 8th @ 10:00 AM CT

Advanced Avionics Upgrades A wide variety of avionics upgrades including the TXi series touchscreen flight displays, GTN series navigators, GMA audio panels, GTX ADS-B transponders, autopilots and more provide aircraft owners with endless panel upgrade options.

• Avionics Upgrades – including the latest TXi series, December 5th @ 4:00 PM CT

ADS-B Solutions for Business Aviation This webinar focuses on a variety of Garmin ADS-B solutions available for a wide range of business jets on the market. Cost-effective solutions are currently available for some of the most popular business aircraft in the industry, including the Citation II/SII, Citation V, Learjet 20/30/60 and more.

• ADS-B Solutions for Business Aircraft, December 11th, 2018 @ 10:00 AM CT

Garmin Pilot Get insider tips and tricks for using the Garmin Pilot mobile app to make flight planning, navigation and flying easier – and more fun.

• Garmin Pilot Tips & Tricks, December 13th @ 4:00 PM CT

Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to www.garmin.com/aviation.

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Garmin Begins Seamless Integration Between FltPlan.com & Garmin Pilot

Garmin Begins Seamless Integration Between FltPlan.com & Garmin Pilot

OLATHE, Kan./October 10, 2018/Business Wire — Garmin International, Inc., a unit of Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ: GRMN), today announced the initial phase of integration between the Garmin Pilot™ app and the popular FltPlan.com web portal. As a result of Garmin’s acquisition of FltPlan.com in August, both companies have made rapid progress in merging portfolios. Beginning next week, pilots will be able to use FltPlan.com for pre-flight planning and filing, and automatically view the same flight plan within the Garmin Pilot app on Apple mobile devices. This announcement represents the first of a series of cohesive enhancements between the FltPlan.com website and the Garmin product line.

“We are proud to show early progress and eager to launch this integration between FltPlan.com and Garmin Pilot,” said Carl Wolf, vice president of aviation marketing and sales. “This announcement symbolizes the beginning of a much anticipated collaboration that merges the most widely-used flight planning and filing tool, with an industry-leading app. With this, we are thrilled to welcome FltPlan.com to the Garmin family and we look forward to growing our collective portfolios to provide our customers with an unrivaled suite of flight planning tools and services.”     

 

FltPlan.com and Garmin Pilot customers can now experience a seamless transition between the FltPlan.com website and the Garmin Pilot application within the United States, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, Venezuela and Columbia. The initial phase of this integration allows customers to create a flight plan on the FltPlan.com website and automatically view the same flight plan information within the Trip Planning section of the Garmin Pilot app.

Within the app, customers can also view recent and future trips that have been created on the website. Once the flight plan populates in the app, pilots can transfer it wirelessly to compatible Garmin avionics or a Garmin integrated flight deck. Additionally, the popular navigation log found on the FltPlan.com website can also be viewed within Garmin Pilot under the NavLog tab in Trip Planning.  

Pilots can create a free FltPlan.com account to take advantage of web-based flight planning and flight management services, which includes access to weather, airport information, fuel prices, printable navigation logs, aircraft performance data and more. By using FltPlan.com and Garmin Pilot, pilots can easily transition from web-based planning, to the Garmin Pilot app and wirelessly transfer the data to compatible Garmin products, saving valuable time prior to any flight. To learn more and to create a free FltPlan.com account, visit www.fltplan.com.

The latest release of the Garmin Pilot app that incorporates FltPlan.com integration on Apple mobile devices will be available next week during the NBAA Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition, October 16-18, 2018 in Orlando, Florida. For new customers, Garmin Pilot is available from the Apple App Store as a free download for the first 30 days. After the 30-day trial period, customers may purchase an annual subscription of Garmin Pilot starting at $74.99. Visit www.garmin.com/aviation for additional information.

Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to www.garmin.com/aviation.

Follow us at facebook.com/garmintwitter.com/garmin, or youtube.com/garmin.

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Garmin Announces New Free Aviation Webinars

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August 1, 2018 - Garmin is pleased to announce it is expanding its robust line-up of popular aviation webinars. Ranging from Garmin Pilot tips and tricks, cost-effective autopilot upgrades to low-cost ADS-B solutions, these free webinars offer pilots and customers with a broad overview of the latest Garmin has to offer, while also providing a general operational overview of its vast product line.

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Garmin Avionics for Experimental Aircraft, September 11th @ 10AM CT

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Low-cost ADS-B, Instruments & Avionics, August 23rd @ 4PM CT

Low-cost ADS-B, Instruments & Avionics, November 8th @ 10AM CT

Advanced Avionics Upgrades

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Avionics Upgrades – including latest TXi series, August 8th @ 7PM CT

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Garmin Pilot

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Garmin Pilot Tips & Tricks, August 16th @ 10AM CT

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Garmin Portable Solutions, September 25th @ 7PM CT

Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to www.garmin.com/aviation.

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GWX 75 Aviation Doppler Weather Radar from Garmin®

GWX 75 Aviation Doppler Weather Radar from Garmin®

Four-times more color contouring for superior weather analysis

OLATHE, Kan. /July 18, 2018/Business Wire — Garmin International, Inc., a unit of Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ: GRMN), today announced the GWX™ 75, a new addition to its suite of weather radars. Intended for a wide range of aircraft, the Doppler-based, solid-state GWX 75 incorporates exceptional range and a new, enhanced color palette that features more color contouring than traditional weather radar on the market. A helicopter version of the weather radar, the GWX 75H is also available. Optional features such as turbulence detection and ground clutter suppression are also available with the GWX 75.

“We are thrilled to continue to broaden our suite of weather radar solutions that meet the needs of thousands of aircraft operators throughout the world,” said Carl Wolf, Garmin vice president of aviation sales and marketing. “With improved features, a lower cost of ownership and easy upgrade path, the GWX 75 is a simple and straightforward weather radar solution that increases situational awareness to aid in navigation around severe weather.”

The GWX 75 provides pilots with a source of on-board weather information to assist in the analysis of convective weather threats, which aids in situational awareness and helps reduce aircraft operational costs. Pilots can tailor a unique weather picture on each individual display in the cockpit, offering superior customization. A high-definition color palette also helps pilots more easily interpret the severity of an individual storm cell or multiple storm cells in an area, which can incorporate four-times more color contouring than typically displayed by other weather radars on the market.

Boasting a solid-state design, the GWX 75 offers reduced power consumption and extended life compared to earlier generation, magnetron-based weather radars. The GWX 75 offers a range of 320 nautical miles, horizontal scan angles of up to 120 degrees and to focus on an area of interest, pilot-adjustable sector scanning. The GWX 75 also retains vertical scan capabilities, which allows the pilot to focus on storm tops, gradients and storm cell build-up at various altitudes.

Utilizing the GWX 75, pilots can more confidently navigate around challenging weather with optional features such as Doppler-enabled turbulence detection and ground clutter suppression. Turbulence detection identifies turbulence in air containing certain particulates, such as precipitation, while ground clutter suppression allows the GWX 75 to separate radar ground returns and remove them from the display. Additionally, Garmin’s exclusive WATCH® (Weather Attenuated Color Highlight) helps to identify shadowing effects of short-range cell activity and highlights areas where radar returns are weakened or attenuated by intense precipitation to allow for more precise weather interpretation.

Additionally, Garmin is launching a new Weather Radar Operations eLearning course, which is available immediately via the flyGarmin® website. This course helps pilots get the most out of a Garmin weather radar by discussing a variety of topics and reviewing operational techniques, such as tilt and range management, weather radar display interpretation, as well as automation and task management. An interactive session also allows pilots to manipulate the controls of the weather radar as various features and settings are reviewed within the PC-based course. This course is available for $149 and comes with a two-year subscription. For additional information, visit https://fly.garmin.com/fly-garmin/.

The GWX 75 is designed as a direct replacement for the GWX 70 or as a new installation in a wide variety of aircraft and is compatible with select Garmin integrated flight decks, the GTN™ 650/750 series touchscreen navigators, the TXi series and G500/G600 flight displays. Customers can later upgrade from the GWX 75 to the GWX 80 weather radar with ease. Garmin has received Technical Standard Order (TSO) certification for the GWX 75 and GWX 75H weather radars, which are expected to be available in August starting at a suggested retail price of $21,995 and $31,995 respectively. For additional information, visit www.garmin.com/GWX75 or contact .

Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to www.garmin.com/aviation.

For decades, Garmin has pioneered new GPS navigation and wireless devices and applications that are designed for people who live an active lifestyle. Garmin serves five primary business units, including automotive, aviation, fitness, marine, and outdoor recreation. For more information, visit Garmin's virtual pressroom at garmin.com/newsroom, contact the Media Relations department at 913-397-8200, or follow us at facebook.com/garmin, twitter.com/garmin, or youtube.com/garmin.

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Garmin® D2 Delta - Latest Generation in Aviator Watches

Garmin® D2 Delta - Latest Generation in Aviator Watches

Three distinct sizes with internal music storage, Garmin Pay and optional wrist-based Pulse Oximeter

OLATHE, Kan. /July 18, 2018/Business Wire — Garmin International, Inc., a unit of Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ: GRMN), today announced the D2TM Delta PX, D2 Delta S and D2 Delta aviator watch series, three new GPS-enabled smartwatches built in a variety of sizes and personalities for pilots and aviation enthusiasts. New to the D2 aviator watch series, the D2 Delta PX incorporates built-in wrist-based Pulse Oximeter1 for oxygen saturation awareness. Additionally, all D2 Delta watches come with wireless connectivity with select Garmin avionics, Garmin PayTM contactless payment solution2, storage for music playlists and more. These features offer pilots more flexibility, greater connectivity and utility in a compact aviator watch that’s as functional as it is stylish.

“The D2 Delta series merges modern style and functionality in a sophisticated watch that is available in three distinct sizes tailored to male and female pilots and aviation enthusiasts,” said Carl Wolf, vice president of aviation marketing and sales. “Whether you’re climbing into a single-pilot cockpit on the weekend, shooting instrument approaches to minimums or flying professionally, the D2 Delta transforms the aviator watch market with exclusive aviation functions and connected features that appeal to every pilot – regardless of what flying they do.”

The premium D2 Delta PX features an elegant titanium gray diamond-like carbon (DLC) finish on a large, 51mm bezel. Especially useful in-flight and during high altitude activities, the D2 Delta PX exclusively incorporates wrist-based Pulse Ox to help monitor oxygen saturation levels.

The D2 Delta S features a stylish rose gold-tone bezel and is lighter, sleeker and smaller than previous D2 models. At 42mm, the D2 Delta S is ideal for smaller wrists and comes with a beige leather strap that makes it easy to transition from the cockpit to a night out. The third model in the series, the D2 Delta, measures 47 mm and has a silver titanium bezel, as well as a premium brown leather strap.

The D2 Delta series seamlessly integrates with select Garmin avionics to achieve a harmonious, connected cockpit. The D2 Delta can connect wirelessly to the Garmin PilotTM app, as well as the GTNTM 650/750 touchscreen navigator series or the G1000® NXi integrated flight deck via Flight Stream 510 to enable wireless flight plan transfer to the watch. When connected, all models in the new D2 Delta series can receive additional information from compatible avionics including GPS position information, altitude, airspeed, groundspeed, magnetic heading, outside air temperature and more.

Bluetooth®-capable music streaming enriches every activity as all models of the D2 Delta incorporate integrated music storage of up to 500 songs within the watch, offering phone-free listening. Download playlists from select music streaming services3 or transfer customized playlists from a computer directly to the watch. Once the playlist is loaded, pilots can pair a D2 Delta with a compatible Bluetooth Garmin audio panel such as the GMATM 245, GMA 345 or GMA 350c. The D2 Delta can also be paired with a Bluetooth headset or headphones (sold separately).

All sizes of the D2 Delta also include Garmin Pay, a contactless payment solution, allowing customers to leave their cash and credit cards at home. Utilizing their Garmin Pay wallet, customers have the same benefits and rewards of the physical cards, with the convenience of having them available on their wrist.

The D2 Delta aviator watch series also features new smartwatch alerting tailored to aviation operations. These new alerts include:

• Configurable pressure altitude notifications, which consists of a series of vibrations when arriving at a selected altitude;

• A fuel tank timer that vibrates at configurable intervals to help remind pilots to switch fuel tanks while in-flight;

• A cross track error notification, which triggers a vibrating alert when pilots deviate from an active flight plan.

The D2 Delta aviator watch series come preloaded with a full multisport toolset for running, golfing, cycling, skiing, workouts and more. It is also water rated to 100 meters so it can withstand swimming and other water activities. When paired with a compatible smartphone4, users can send, receive and respond to text messages and see social media updates, app alerts, calls, emails and more via the watch. Garmin ElevateTM wrist-based heart rate technology also monitors heart rate 24/7 alongside daily activity tracking. Because the D2 Delta is versatile and supports a variety of activities, QuickFit® bands allow users to easily switch between stylish leather and metal accessory bands to sporty silicone in seconds and without tools.

All of the new D2 Delta models come preloaded with a worldwide aviation database and incorporate signature aviation accents, dedicated direct-to and nearest airport buttons, as well as the option to input a customizable aircraft tail number on the face of the watch. A large, sunlight-readable, high-resolution color display with an LED backlight on the watch face, allows pilots to view data in most lighting conditions in the cockpit. The D2 Delta PX offers up to 18 hours of battery life in GPS and Pulse Ox mode and up to 20 days in smartwatch mode.

The D2 Delta aviator watch is expected to be available in August for a suggested retail price of $899 for the D2 Delta S; $949 for the D2 Delta; and $1,249 for the D2 Delta PX titanium edition. All three versions of the D2 Delta also come with a silicone band and free aviation database updates. Garmin will be showcasing the new D2 Delta aviator watch series at the 2018 EAA AirVenture fly-in, in Oshkosh, Wis., July 23-29, 2018. To learn more, visit www.garmin.com/D2.

Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to www.garmin.com/aviation.

For decades, Garmin has pioneered new GPS navigation and wireless devices and applications that are designed for people who live an active lifestyle. Garmin serves five primary business units, including automotive, aviation, fitness, marine, and outdoor recreation. For more information, visit Garmin's virtual pressroom at garmin.com/newsroom, contact the Media Relations department at 913-397-8200, or follow us at facebook.com/garmin, twitter.com/garmin, or youtube.com/garmin.

1. This is not a medical device and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or monitoring of any medical condition; see Garmin.com/ataccuracy. Pulse Ox is not available in all regions. 2. Available for supported cards from participating banks 3. May require a premium subscription by a third-party music provider. 4.When paired with a compatible smartphone; see Garmin.com/ble

 

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Garmin Pilot App Launches Real-Time Engine Data Display

Garmin Pilot App Launches Real-Time Engine Data Display

Garmin Pilot app launches real-time engine data display with play-back, best-in-class document viewer and more for Apple and Android mobile devices; adds weight and balance, weather enhancements and more

OLATHE, Kan. /July 18, 2018/Business Wire — Garmin International, Inc., a unit of Garmin Ltd. (NASDAQ: GRMN), today announced several new additions to the Garmin PilotTM feature set for Apple and Android mobile devices. Among the updates, wireless real-time display and play-back of engine data is available within Garmin Pilot via Flight Stream 510 when the app is paired with an EIS-capable TXi flight display or the G1000® NXi integrated flight deck. A new document viewer provides easy access to the Garmin aviation library, as well as access to popular cloud storage providers, and the addition of weather improvements further enhance the app. New for Android, weight and balance calculations and several more features aid in flight planning. These new capabilities offer greater utility within a single application and more integration within the Garmin ecosystem.

“With Garmin Pilot, customers receive an optimized Garmin experience, whether it’s monitoring engine performance, accessing Garmin pilots guides within the document viewer, database loading or wirelessly transferring flight plan data – pilots have it all easily accessible at their fingertips,” said Carl Wolf, vice president of aviation marketing and sales. “Garmin Pilot is a comprehensive application with capabilities that no other app on the market can deliver. A simple and familiar user-interface that closely represents Garmin avionics, cutting-edge integration and a competitive feature set combine to offer pilots the best value in the industry.”

Garmin Pilot for Apple mobile devices
flyGarmin® and Engine Information System (EIS) analytics

Exclusive to Garmin, customers will be able to utilize Garmin Pilot on Apple mobile devices to view real- time engine information via Flight Stream 510 when the app is paired with an EIS-capable TXi flight display or the G1000 NXi integrated flight deck. Upon landing, the flight data log is wirelessly uploaded to the flyGarmin website and is stored securely within the app and on flyGarmin. Within the flyGarmin website, pilots can access detailed information related to any flight, play back the flight and download data logs. Pilot-configurable exceedances can also be set within the flyGarmin website. In the event an exceedance occurs, pilots can receive an email alert that details that particular exceedance. Utilizing Garmin Pilot alongside an EIS-capable TXi flight display or G1000 NXi, pilots are provided with a comprehensive, in-depth look at engine performance and trend data and can more easily troubleshoot and identify potential issues.

Best-in-class document viewer

The new document viewer within Garmin Pilot helps pilots better organize and access a variety of informational products, including the latest Garmin library of manuals such as pilots guides and cockpit reference guides, aviation handbooks and more. The premium version of Garmin Pilot allows customers to access popular cloud storage sites like DropBox to create and add their own documents such as an aircraft flight manual (AFM) in PDF, JPG and PNG formats. Additionally, pilots can bookmark all electronic documents and highlight them for easy recall within the app.

Additional enhancements expected to be available for Apple mobile devices:

• The flight profile view within the app displays Pilot Reports (PIREPs) alongside airspace, terrain, obstacles, TFR’s and weather.

• Pilots can view the Area Forecast Discussion (AFD) within Garmin Pilot, which is a plain-English narrative developed by meteorologists at the National Weather Service.

• Model Output Statistics (MOS) are accessible within the app, which displays a forecast similar in format to the Terminal Aerodrome Forecast (TAF). The MOS is updated hourly and the forecast extends 72 hours into the future.

• Within the U.S. and Europe, pilots can view base reflectivity radar, which utilizes the lowest elevation scan to display precipitation falling from the clouds better than other radar scans.

• Transitioning across multiple Apple mobile devices or adding a new device to an existing account is easier as user preferences such as weight and balance, charts, settings, downloads and more are saved to the flyGarmin website.

• The new D2TM Delta PX aviator watch connects wirelessly to the app to display wrist-based Pulse Oximeter1 and heart rate data in the navigation bar and within the Connext® menu. Garmin Pilot also supports wireless flight plan transfer to the new D2TM Delta aviator watch.

• Pilots can create a custom map shape file on a computer to design a customized map so it’s easier to reference their position relative to a specific geographic area, such as a practice area. This map file is transferred from a computer via email and then uploaded within the app.

Garmin Pilot for Android mobile devices

Garmin Pilot on Android mobile devices incorporates weight and balance calculations into a flight plan or a saved trip, taking into account fuel burn and more. Pilots can take advantage of pre-loaded aircraft types or enter aircraft weight and balance figures manually, noting the arm, moment and station of each point from the Pilot’s Operating Handbook (POH). Center of gravity (CG) is easily referenced in the application relative to an active flight plan. In the event CG limits entered within the app are not loaded within the envelope, pilots receive a notification. Additionally, customized weight and balance profiles can be shared across multiple Garmin Pilot accounts.

Additional features expected to be available for Android mobile devices:

• Storm cell movement displays the projected path of a storm. An orange circle paired with a line that extends from the strongest storm cells shows its potential path in 15, 30, 45 and 60-minute intervals. If hail or tornadic activity is present, a corresponding icon will also be displayed alongside the particular storm cell line.

• Pilots can also view the Area Forecast Discussion (AFD) that is disseminated in a plain-English narrative within the app.

• The new D2TM Delta PX aviator watch and Garmin Pilot connect to display Pulse Oximeter1 and heart rate data in the navigation bar and within the Connext® menu. Wireless fight plan transfer to the watch is also supported by the app.

The newest release of Garmin Pilot for Apple and Android mobile devices is expected to be available next week during the 2018 EAA AirVenture fly-in, in Oshkosh, Wis., July 23-29, 2018. For new customers, Garmin Pilot is available from the Apple App Store and Google Play Store as a free download for the first 30 days. After the 30-day trial period, customers may purchase an annual subscription of Garmin Pilot starting at $74.99. Visit www.garmin.com/aviation for additional information.

Garmin’s aviation business segment is a leading provider of solutions to OEM, aftermarket, military and government customers. Garmin’s portfolio includes navigation, communication, flight control, hazard avoidance, an expansive suite of ADS-B solutions and other products and services that are known for innovation, reliability, and value. For more information about Garmin’s full line of avionics, go to www.garmin.com/aviation.

For decades, Garmin has pioneered new GPS navigation and wireless devices and applications that are designed for people who live an active lifestyle. Garmin serves five primary business units, including automotive, aviation, fitness, marine, and outdoor recreation. For more information, visit Garmin's virtual pressroom at garmin.com/newsroom, contact the Media Relations department at 913-397-8200, or follow us at facebook.com/garmin, twitter.com/garmin, or youtube.com/garmin.

1.This is not a medical device and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or monitoring of any medical condition; see Garmin.com/ataccuracy. Pulse Ox is not available in all regions.

 

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