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Bill Crouse created a new topic ' Landing gear doors slow to close (gear up)' in the forum. 3 days ago

I'm new to 210 ownership, I'm a tractor mechanic so I understand hydraulics pretty good, my problem is that my 210F 1966 Landing Gear works great but the gear doors are slow to retract when in flight (gear up) witch tells me that the system is low on hydraulic fluid and that it takes more fluid to retract than extend,
I have filled the system according to manual, but I think there is some stupid thing that is escaping me. please help, Thanks in advance Bill

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Heather S created a new topic ' For Sale: 1940 Luscombe 8A' in the forum. 2 weeks ago

Extremely clean & well maintained 1940 Luscombe 8A
Total time: 2435; TSMOH 1161. Nov, 2016 annual.
New Slick mags and Scott tailwheel.
Removable tablet mount.
Many extras, including electric pre-heater, winter kit, removable oversized brake pedals, cowl plugs, wheel chocks, cowl blanket cover, plus lots of other extras.
Radio, intercom, & mini fire extinguisher included.
Optional deluxe tow bar. External antenna.

PLEASE MESSAGE HEATHER FOR SELLERS' CONTACT INFORMATION

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JAMES MCDONALD is friends with Heather S

TODD COVEY is friends with JIM EPTING

TOM SCHIFF is friends with JIM EPTING

GARY SKINNER is friends with JIM EPTING

John Patton created a new topic ' now fork conversion c 182' in the forum. 4 weeks ago

Own a 65 cessna 182. Would like to take plane in to Utah and Idaho backcountry strips. Would restrict it to 850 tires, not larger. Appreciate any comments on this. I know 850's will work on the mains. what do you recommend on nose gear. Do you need to reinforce nose gear or is it possible? Thanks, John Patton, Mancos, CO.

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Piqua, Ohio, Aug. 28, 2017 -- Hartzell Propeller has added to its series of how-to videos for pilots and mechanics. The newest video covers the evaluation of structural composite propeller blades by describing the ins and outs of composite prop pre-flight checks for pilots.
"Pre-flight checks for structural composite propellers are very similar to metal props with some subtle differences," said Hartzell Propeller Executive Vice President JJ Frigge. "Hartzell's composite expert Kevin Ryan walks pilots through the pre-flight step by step, including a discussion of nicks, gouges and paint erosion caused by runway debris."
In the video, Ryan also addresses trailing edge impact damage from tow bars or other ground handling equipment. He describes airworthy damage limits and how to properly "coin tap" the blade to detect evidence of possible delamination.
Hartzell uses aerospace grade composite construction materials that are incredibly durable, but they are not entirely immune to damage. Unlike aluminum or wooden blades, Hartzell's composite propeller blades can be restored to their original dimensions over and over again, providing excellent life-cycle costs.

Pilots can view the new video clicking on Hartzell Propeller Composite Blade Pre-flight Check.
100th Year in Business
Celebrating its 100th year, Hartzell Propeller is the global leader in advanced technology aircraft propeller design and manufacturing for business, commercial and government customers. The company designs next generation propellers with innovative "blended airfoil" technology and manufactures them with revolutionary machining centers, robotics and custom resin transfer molding curing stations.

With ASC-II™ composite technology, Hartzell delivers optimal performance, strength, and durability with carbon fiber blades. Hartzell Propeller and its sister company, Hartzell Engine Technologies LLC, form the general aviation business unit of Tailwind Technologies Inc. For more info on Hartzell Propeller go to www.hartzellprop.com.

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File Attachment:

File Name: H.video2.pdf
File Size: 156 KB


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DANIEL LECLAIR created a new topic ' For Sale: Stratus 2, and a GTX327 Transponder' in the forum. 4 weeks ago

I just upgraded to a GTX345 and have a Status 2, and a Garmin GTX327 for sale. The Stratus 2 is about a year old and has been used around a dozen times. Includes the Stratus 2 with base attachment and Ram suction cup mount, ADS-B antenna with 10' of wire, External GPS with 10' of wire, Extra USB charging cable, and the A.C. adapter with another accompanying USB charging cable. Retailed for $1033.00. I am asking $775 for everything including case, manuals, etc.

I also have the GTX 327 Transponder with tray and plug with an 8130 for $750.00. Let me know if anyone is interested you can call or send me your email address and I'll be happy to forward forward pictures of the GTX327 if anyone would like them.

Dan LeClair
419-262-0691


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Jen D created a new topic ' Hurricane Harvey' in the forum. 4 weeks ago

Our thoughts are with those folks affected by Hurricane Harvey. Any members who have been affected, please let us know if we can help.
Jen

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Michael powers created a new topic ' Nav lights replacement' in the forum. 1 month ago

I am thinking about replacing my steady green, red and white tail strobe with NavStrobe Sextant 40 which meets requirements of TSO-C30c in my Cessna 172B. I understand this means they can only manufacturer the product but I ws wondering if there is a STC or other requirement to install these these lights.

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Capt.Greg replied to the topic 'C182RG Nose Wheel Shimmy' in the forum. 1 month ago

Steve,
Thanks for the info. It was great chatting with you at Alaska Aviation Gathering this year.
Greg

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STEVE ELLS replied to the topic 'Manifold Fluctuation' in the forum. 1 month ago

Before you start pumping contact cleaner through those components, please call Main Turbo, a widely recognized turbo charger repair facility to see if the chemicals in contact cleaner will damage any of the interior parts of these components. The phone is 888 847-8008. Website is www.mainturbo.com
My recommendation is to use what's called Stoddard solvent; it's a petroleum based cleaner. It's also known as mineral spirits.
I've never heard of anyone using contact cleaner for this task.
Please report back with what they say.

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Gary Rudolph replied to the topic 'Manifold Fluctuation' in the forum. 1 month ago

I'll try different RPMs next time I'm that high to see if that cleans it up any. I also had some recommendations and instructions from an A&P to use contact cleaner to backflush the wastegate, regulator and hoses that typically get built up on the T206Hs.

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STEVE ELLS replied to the topic 'C182RG Nose Wheel Shimmy' in the forum. 1 month ago

Hi, I have a few suggestions. First, the shimmy dampener body does not move when you swing the nose gear left and right; the piston inside the shimmy dampener does.
As you point out the shimmy dampener does not have to be removed from the nose gear strut to be serviced with hydraulic fluid (Mil H 5606). The procedure from the manual is as follows:
a. Using the tow bar, turn the nose wheel strut to the extreme left position (thru serial
R18200710), to the extreme right position (beginning with serial R18200711), against
the stop. This will place the shimmy dampener piston to the rear of the cylinder and
eliminate the possibility of trapping air in the cylinder.
2-18
MODEL R182 AND TR182 SERVICE MANUAL
b. Remove the filler plug and fill with hydraulic fluid.
c. Replace filler plug and turn nose wheel strut through its entire travel several times.
d. Return strut to the extreme left position (thru serial R18200710), to the extreme right
position (beginning with R18200711) against the stop.
e. Remove filler plug and add whatever fluid is needed to fill the cylinder.
f. Replace and safety the filler plug.
If you have to add more than an ounce or two of fluid, it's likely that the dampener is leaking and needs to be removed and repacked prior to servicing. The packings are generic O rings. I order a packing kit from McFarlane Aviation. Cost is less than $10.
Other items to check are the balance of the nose tire wheel assembly; an out of balance assembly can cause shimmy. The next step is to check for wear and slop in the nose gear torque links. If these links aren't tight then the shimmy dampener won't be able to dampen shimmy since the shimmy won't be completely transferred to the dampener.
Unfortunately there is one more problem with R182 shimmy dampener installations. The collar that is bolted into position on the nose gear strut and that the shimmy dampener is bolted to has been found to be weak. As I understand the problem, the shimmy dampener clamp was not strong enough and a locating pin welded into the inside surface of the clamp was to small to prevent the clamp from moving relative the strut. This movement lessens the stability of the dampener on the strut which reduces the effectiveness of the dampener.
Cessna issued Service Bulletin 84-15R1 on October 5,1984. This SB said: "An improvement of the shimmy dampener installation has been incorporated on current production aircraft and includes a thicker shimmy dampener clamp, a larger locator pin and corresponding nose gear strut outer barrel change."
Service kits SK182-83 and -84 provided instruction and parts. In 1984 the cost of the SK was $418. These kits are still available from Cessna but the cost is now around $15,800.
Bad clamps are pretty easy to see. Put a sharp mark across the clamp/strut and move the nose tire back and forth. Any movement of the clamp is bad news.
If you see clamp movement, remove the clamp to determine the amount of wear in the strut barrel.
You may be able to find a complete nose gear assembly from a later model R/TR 182 in a salvage yard that costs less than the Cessna kit.

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STEVE ELLS replied to the topic 'Manifold Fluctuation' in the forum. 1 month ago

Hi Sorry it's taken a while to respond.
Are you familiar with the term "bootstrapping?" Bootstrapping is when there's only enough exhaust gas pressures passing by the turbine wheel in the Turbocharger to provide a neutral (not positive) pressure at the engine intake. I mention this because the erratic MAP begins it starts when you start your climb to a higher cruise altitude and stops when you descend.
When the turbocharge system is bootstrapping any small change in altitude (air density) or aircraft attitude (variances in inlet air pressure) will affect the MAP in a linear fashion.
It's pretty easy to see that the cure for bootstrapping is to increase the engine RPM, thereby increasing exhaust pressures which results in a positive inlet air pressure.
If you took closely at the relationship between RPM and MAP, especially at about 1:20 into the flight you'll see how RPM affects both fuel flow and MAP. In fact, this relationship is evident all through the charts you've provided.
Mouse Milk is the best stuff for lubing the wastegate so you did the right thing there.
I suggest that whenever you experience erratic MAP, especially at higher altitudes that you bump the RPM up; I think you'll find your erratic MAP problem goes away.
Happy Flying

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Contact: Katie Church
Air Plains Services
Phone: 620.326.8904
Email: 439 N. West Rd.
PO Box 541
Wellington, KS 67152
www.airplains.com

PRESS RELEASE

Air Plains Services Statement on FAA Emergency AD regarding Lycoming Engines
Wellington, KS. (August 11, 2017) – Air Plains Services has already contacted its customers impacted by the FAA’s proposed Airworthiness Directive regarding a mandatory inspection of certain Lycoming engines installed or overhauled since November 2015.
“We’ve been working with our customers on this since the Lycoming Service Bulletin came out last week,” said Mike Kelley, president of Air Plains Services. “We stay connected with all our customers anyway and on critical issues like this, we like to get ahead of the issue.”
The emergency AD was issued by the FAA late Wednesday (Aug. 9), following the release of a Mandatory Service Bulletin (632B) by Lycoming Engines issued August 4. The AD requires owners of Lycoming engines installed or overhauled between November 2015 and February 2017 to inspect and potentially replace off-spec connecting rod small-end bushings. The affected engines include about 20 Lycoming O360 engines sold by Air Plains Services, and those customers have all been contacted.
For more information, contact Air Plains Services at 1.800.752.8481.
###

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Gary Rudolph created a new topic ' Manifold Fluctuation' in the forum. 1 month ago

I've recently purchased a 2008 T206H and have been having issues with manifold fluctuations at altitude. In the last flight (today) it started fluctuating at 16,500. I'd keep the throttle, mixture and prop as reasonably stable once at 17,500. I've also experienced issues at lower altitudes (14,500) on other flights.

I did use some Mouse Milk on the wastegate shaft the best I could do it without disassembling anything and moving the wastegate with an adjustable crescent wrench. At this point I was going to bring it into the shop, but I'd like to consider opinions on the culprits. 1. Wastegate, 2. Pressure Regulator, 3. Fuel Pump (I forgot to turn on the electric fuel pump to see if that helps). The engine does have 1700 hours, so it's not unlikely something is worn out.

T206H-1.png

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