Destination

Destination (64)

Kansas City is the closest major city to the geographic center of the contiguous United States. As such, the city has been a hub throughout U.S. history. Officially deemed the City of Fountains—but colloquially referred to as the “Paris of the Plains”—Kansas City is now a burgeoning city for vacationers. Tourism grew by a whopping 500,000 visitors from 2015 to 2016 according to VisitKC.com. You can add yourself to the tally if you venture to the Heart of America this spring. Getting there by air It’s pretty easy to get here from anywhere, and there are plenty of choices for the GA flyer. Charles B. Wheeler Downtown Airport (KMKC) The GA-friendly Charles B. Wheeler Downtown Airport (KMKC) immediately north of the Missouri River will put you in the middle of the action. This historic airport was dedicated by Charles Lindbergh in 1927 and was one of the headquarters for TWA. With a 24-hour control tower and FBO, Category I ILS, plus full maintenance, decent self-serve fuel prices ($3.99/gallon at the time of this writing), aircraft leasing, flight instruction, hangar rentals and car rentals, KMKC is a busy place for GA, charter and corporate operations on the Missouri-Kansas border. Operations at…
I thought I knew about Miami, I realize now, has all come from the television. “Miami Vice,” “The Golden Girls” and “Burn Notice”—these fictional portrayals all shaped my idea of the city’s surroundings, its residents and its culture. I think I was more wrong than I was right. When I started looking deeper, I realized why Miami is portrayed so much in films and on TV: it’s a huge hub for this kind of thing. There are more than 2,000 motion picture, music and video companies based in Miami; dozens of recording studios and sound stages; hundreds of freelance production crews; dozens of cable television networks. Miami looks shiny and new, and it is, relatively speaking. Nothing here is much more than a century old, as this port city was incorporated in 1896 with, surprisingly, just 300 residents. It’s a city that has made its name known—so much so that the former Dade County was officially changed to “Miami-Dade County” in the 1990s. Today, Miami is considered one of the richest cities in the United States. With miles of picturesque boulevards and high-end shopping, hundreds of high-rise buildings and the most concentrated grouping of international banks in the country, this…
I'd been attending AirVenture—“Oshkosh”—every year since 1994, but always by a public conveyance. For three years I had been speechifying about flying my 1960s-era single engine aircraft, Papa, to KOSH, but every year I found that the airplane wasn’t quite ready, so it was to the airlines (again). Not so in 2015. By early July of last year I had installed the Electronics International CGR-30P and -30C, two very sophisticated engine and systems monitoring instruments. (For more information about the installation, see “Trading Six Instruments for Two: Cluster Gauge Replacement” in the August 2015 issue of Cessna Flyer. —Ed.). I had completed the wiring to my new Aveo Engineering Ultra Galactica wingtip navigation and strobe lights system; installed new tires from Desser Tire; and repacked and serviced the landing gear struts. My portable oxygen system manufactured by Precise Flight was filled and tested. The night before the trip, I was striving to remember everything. I would be away from my local airport for nearly three weeks: did I have the oil, tools, supplies and emergency equipment I would need? The launch The next morning, I pulled my car into the hangar after I had loaded Papa with tools, a suitcase,…
A mile of concrete will launch you and your airplane to anywhere, but not without the right paperwork filed in the right places. Association member Pam Busboom takes us through the process, step by step. January 2016 So you’re finally ready to stretch your wings and leave the confines of the United States. Good for you! But be forewarned: when you first investigate what is required for international flight originating from the United States, the to-do list is daunting. And, make no mistake, getting it all lined up is a task that will require attention, fortitude, patience, a computer with internet access—and a cup filled with your caffeine- or alcohol-based beverage of choice. If you’re so armed, let’s get started! What exactly is required for you and your airplane prior to an international trip? Each country has slightly different requirements, and there is paperwork required by the United States to let you come back after your international visit. The bad news is there is a lot to do. The good news is that once you get through all of it, things become much easier for future trips. Comprehensive requirements First, let’s look at the list of requirements to get to…
By Kristin Winter Contributing editor Kristin Winter shares her experiences at AOPA’s last regional fly-in of 2016 in Prescott, Ariz. Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) made a huge change a few years ago when it discontinued its big annual convention and chose to organize regional fly-ins instead. In 2016, these fly-ins have started to hit their stride. I decided to check out the last one of the year held at Ernest A. Love Field (KPRC) in Prescott, Ariz. on Oct. 1, 2016. I’d last attended an AOPA regional event in May 2015, in Salinas, Calif. AOPA reported that the Prescott event drew 6,300 attendees—about two-and-a-half times the number that attended Salinas the year prior. That figure is as many as attended the last AOPA Aviation Summit in 2013. The local scene AOPA’s regional fly-ins all seem to have their own flavor, depending on the aviation scene locally. As Prescott is home to one of the two major campuses of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU), the university had a big presence. ERAU had a tent to welcome alumni which I checked into, as I meet the prerequisite. Embry-Riddle also had a recruitment tent. The campus itself is a few miles away…
December 2015 Mere miles away from the US mainland, Victoria, BC is a worthy destination and constitutes international travel to boot! Situated on the southern tip of Canada’s Vancouver Island, only the Strait of Juan de Fuca separates the city from Port Angeles to the south, and the Haro Strait and San Juan Islands from Bellingham and Seattle to the east.
Last month Pam Busboom explained everything that is needed to make an international flight originating in the United States. In part two, she goes step-by-step on how to fill out all of the online paperwork. In the second half of this article I’ll be walking you through exactly how to register on the FCC website, apply for your radio license documents, get enrolled with eAPIS and order your CPB decal. Brace yourself: we are about to embark on a journey through government forms, applications, passwords and terminology. Step one: Get your FRN from the FCCFirst things first: you have to register on the FCC website. The result of this registration will be that you get a unique 10-digit identification number called an FCC Registration Number (FRN). As far as the FCC is concerned, that number equals you. To do this, go to the FCC Universal Licensing System (ULS) website at wireless.fcc.gov/uls/. There, you will see a number of selections, one of which says “new users.” Click here.You are now on a second screen with several options. You can either look for public domain records, update an earlier registration (but you’ll need an FRN to do that) or—and this is what…
This document provides references for filing International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Filed Flight Plans (FPL) and associated flight planning messages for flights within United States domestic airspace. Follow this link to download from original source. FAA ICAO Flight Planning Interface Reference Guide
Form FCC 605, Schedule C, is a supplementary schedule for use with the FCC Quick-Form Application for Authorization in the Ship, Aircraft, Amateur, Restricted and Commercial Operator, and the General Mobile Radio Services, FCC 605 Main Form. This schedule is used to supply information for authorizations in the Aircraft Radio Service (Part 87). The FCC 605 Main Form must be filed in conjunction with this schedule.
LightHawk volunteer pilots provide the powerful perspective of flight to help conservation experts make better decisions. June 2015- This month we’re diverting from our regular destination feature. Instead of focusing on one small area of our marvelous planet, we’d like to draw attention to the wild locations found in between the airports, bed-and-breakfast inns and hundred-dollar-hamburger spots. Dan Pimentel has put the spotlight on some pilots who volunteer to do a different kind of daytripping in this month’s story, which we’ve titled, “Destination: Downstream.” We hope you enjoy the tour. —Ed. While there is disagreement about the existence of a changing climate, there is one particular part of that debate to which all parties, regardless of politics, can agree: we all live on this one planet called Earth. And that’s not about to change in our lifetimes. Every day, people discuss what we should be doing to protect our planet, and whether it needs protecting at all. But if you’re a volunteer pilot for LightHawk—a nonprofit organization that began in 1979 with one man and a borrowed plane—your mission isn’t to support a particular side of the argument. Your mission is to provide support for those working to solve the…
If you like tall trees, saltwater, clean air, wildlife, hiking, biking, sailing and an easy pace of life, it's time to put "Flying into the San Juan Islands" up near the top of your flying bucket list. May 2015- Needing a large dose of slow-down last fall, I traveled from California back to the Great Northwest—land of the big trees and water—where I first learned to fly. I had family in the Seattle area and visited frequently, but never felt recharged after those big-city visits. I needed rest. The San Juan Islands—"SJI"—is an archipelago consisting of 15 larger islands located in the farthest northwest corner of the continental United States. It seemed like the perfect place for a getaway. The major islands are Lopez, San Juan, Shaw and Orcas. These islands are served several times a day by ferry boats of the Washington State Ferry System. The smaller islands—Decatur, Blakely, Stuart, Waldron, and Henry—are not.
It's more than just a mile from Texarkana, and it's more than just a relic from the steamboat days. April 2015- The surveyors were off—by a whole 30 miles—but the song is still popular. That song would be "Cotton Fields" recorded in 1940 by blues legend Lead Belly and covered by everyone from The Beach Boys, Elvis, Johnny Cash, and, of course, Creedence Clearwater Revival. Shreveport, La., a city with a metro area of over 350,000 residents, is now the economic center for a tri-state area known as "ArkLaTex." Shreveport today is revitalized in large part because of the introduction of riverboat gambling in the 1990s. With five casinos in the Shreveport-Bossier area, locals—and visitors (mainly from "Ark" and "Tex")—can find their favorite slot machines, games tables, and even a horseracing track. If a quiet day fishing by kayak is more your style, Shreveport can provide that, too. Several outdoor recreational areas, including Cypress Black Bayou in nearby Benton, provide visitors an opportunity to fish, swim, camp and explore. Bassmaster fishing tournaments are held frequently on the Red River, and this twisty-turny waterway is what geographically separates old-town Shreveport and Bossier City (pronounced "Bozhur"). The climate here is zone eight,…
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