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TOPIC: Century Series Inspections

Century Series Inspections 4 years 1 week ago #31

  • Jen D
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GARYSMITH wrote:
Hey Jen,

I agree with you (should I be worried?!? :evil: ).
gws

Probably!

I also wonder what the motivation behind this is.

Jen
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Century Series Inspections 4 years 1 week ago #30

  • GARYSMITH
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Hey Jen,

I agree with you (should I be worried?!? :evil: ). This new requirement could be open to interpretation by the powers that be, and that's seldom a good thing.

I've also read several other articles that examined the age of different a/c and accident rates. None of the ones I've read demonstrated a correlation between the age & accidents.

So, I have to wonder why this expanded inspection requirement is being implemented. Is Cessna trying to force the aging a/c out of the market to avoid potential liability, or is there something else going on?

I don't understand why this is being introduced at this point given that none of the data seems to correlate the age to accidents.

As a famous ad campaign once said, "Inquiring minds wanna know..."

gws
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Century Series Inspections 4 years 1 week ago #29

  • Jen D
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Hi Gary!
I think there is definitely a risk of "abuse" (for lack of a better term) with requirements like this. That the powers that me can interpret the rules and make it hard for the average Cessna owner to comply.

It's one of those solutions to a mostly non-existent problem. Last time I looked - and I really did look - there was no specific correlation between the age of the airframe and the accident frequency. I compared Cessna 177 models - all of which are old to Cirrus - all of which are "relatively" new and Cardinals were not falling out of the sky at a faster rate than Cirri.

How many accidents total are due to the failure of the airframe itself?

and that my .02 cents! :P
Jen
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Century Series Inspections 4 years 1 week ago #28

  • GARYSMITH
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Dear John & Jen,

Thanks for working to track down some more info on the SID requirements. IMHO, this is one of the most important issues facing the "average flyers" out there who own these older a/c.

I don't mind having thorough annuals. As a matter of fact, my mechanic and I have always gone over "The Other Woman" very carefully. I don't like the idea of "unexpected surprises" in the air, especially when those surprises could be prevented by a thorough inspection.

But, as with everything, these inspections can be taken to extremes & put a lot of folks out of the flying game.

Just my $0.02

gws
Last Edit: 4 years 1 week ago by GARYSMITH.
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Century Series Inspections 4 years 2 weeks ago #19

  • John B
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From member Jen D:

Hi Gary,
Here is some info I got from Cessna, but it's not very in depth. Let me see what else I can track down.

Supplemental Inspection Documents
The Supplemental Inspection Documents or SID’s have been released for the 200 and 100 Series piston engine aircraft and the 1996 and on Single Engine Piston Aircraft. All SID’s Inspections are now incorporated into the affected Maintenance Manuals via revision with the exception of the early 120, 140, 170 and 195 models which have been released as stand-alone inspections. Answers to some frequently asked questions are presented here.

The SID’s and CAP Relationship
SEL-05-01 Revision 1 was developed to announce that some of the existing Continued Airworthiness Program (CAP) inspections have been superseded by the SID program. The CAP inspections were superseded by the SID’s to enable modern inspection methods, move to task based inspection techniques and add additional inspection necessitated by the service history and analysis of the structural capabilities present in various models. Because the CAP was not eliminated, the CAP inspections that were not superseded by SID’s must be accomplished at the appropriate time as defined in the Continuous Airworthiness Program.

Variation in the SID’s
Some confusion exists in regard to why one SID applies to a specific serial group and why other examples of the same model do not need to be inspected in the same manor or at the same interval. The simple explanation is the SID’s inspection tasks are based on service history and analysis. Some of the SID tasks do not apply to every airplane of a particular model run and some vary by serial. The variance is based on structural and gross weight changes that occurred as the models evolved.
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Century Series Inspections 4 years 2 weeks ago #18

  • John B
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From member Gary Smith:

Has anyone heard anything new on the "expanded inspection requirements" for the 100 series Cessnas? Last I heard, they were still talking about making everyone do an in-depth inspection of all 100 series aircraft. The estimates were that these expanded inspections would add somewhere between 10-20 hours per annual. If that's true, I think we'll see a lot of older Cessnas going to the scrap heap. :(
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