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TOPIC: Cessna 172 longest running Aircraft Model at 44000 built. Structural Concerns

Cessna 172 longest running Aircraft Model at 44000 built. Structural Concerns 1 year 2 months ago #1130

  • STEVE ELLS
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Hi,
One tool owners and mechanics should use to determine the airworthiness of single engine Cessna airplanes is SIDs.
Cessna Aircraft has printed Supplemental Inspection Documents (SID) for almost all of its 100 and 200 series single engine aircraft. Each SID provide very complete information on critical and on-going inspection criteria. For instance, the SID for the 1977-1986 Cessna 182 is 196 pages long.
To obtain a copy of the SID for your airplane contact the Cessna customer support office at:
or at 316 517-5800.
I've interested in the "catastrophic incident" wing separation and emergency AD you mention. The FAA issued an emergency airworthiness directive (AD) calling for inspections of 300 and 400 series wings back in 2005 but to the best of my knowledge, backed up by research, there has never been an AD issued against the wings of a single engine Cessna. I hope you can provide more information.
Happy Flying
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Cessna 172 longest running Aircraft Model at 44000 built. Structural Concerns 1 year 3 months ago #1120

The topic of this Forum Entry is the Long running Cessna 172 skyhawk. With the first Aircraft produced in 1955, there are over 44,000 Plus produced. Many are still flying in the Air Today. The subject of this topic is the Structural wear and tear of this specific aircraft model and what to look out for. Are there any known areas that have known to deteriorate through time.

Attached below is a Cessna 172 Cutaway Drawing showing the interior structure of the aircraft (Flight Global). The Cessna 172 is known to be a very soundly designed Aircraft with its long history. However, we must not be complacent remain proactive. I am a retired aircraft mechanic, but don't consider myself to be any expert on the 172. There are so many types of Aircraft and its difficult to specialize on any single airplane.

In one catastrophic incident a wing separate which later resulted in the FAA issuing an Emergency Airworthiness Directive requiring fluorescent-dye-penetrant inspections of the wing-attach flanges at 200-hour intervals. Even with these mandates, its always better to be extremely diligent. We don't want to be "That Guy"
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