P model

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4 months 3 weeks ago #3286 by STEVE ELLS
Replied by STEVE ELLS on topic P model
Hi John,
The directions for using the seat rail gauge are here: www.mcfarlaneaviation.com/media/document...-rail-wear-gauge.pdf

AD 2011-10-09 has detailed drawings of the inspection criteria.

I have attached that AD.

Hopefully, this will answer your questions.

Steve
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4 months 3 weeks ago #3285 by GARY PALMER
Replied by GARY PALMER on topic P model
The concern about the seat rail is that the hole into which the pin drops starts to wear and get wider and sloped edges. My mechanic showed me the AD and his device for measuring the wear on that hole. There are more details, but the AD did have some objective specification on what would be considered "bad". On my 1975 M model, the rails had been replaced once already, but were very worn. I was already doing some interior work and decided to replace the rails too (owner assisted). I bought rails AND the drilling guides. I was also lucky that the rails were now installed with nuts and bolts. My lessons learned:
1- get a set of new screws, do not reuse. It just can make things easier and remove any doubt or worry about old/worn screws.
2- Use the drill guides very carefully (clamp very securely to the old rails, drill through old screw holes and the guide, then clamp securely to the new rails, and drill a small hole first, then enlarge to correct size.),
3- Keep track of which rail is front or to where, they are not all alike,
4- be SUPER careful to clamp the guides to the same location on the rails (like end to end),
5- do not let the guide moving while drilling.
6- measure twice, cut/drill once.
7- put tape over one side of the wrench and use grease to secure a nut because you might find you can barely reach in to hold the nut.

Assume you will, at some point, cut you hand, the metal edges of the access holes are not perfect. and work slowly and carefully, it took me, with occasional mechanics help, about 5-6 hours to remove, drill and install. Every step was more effort than I thought.

I am glad that I will probably never have to do this again in my plane! ;-)
Good luck
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4 months 3 weeks ago #3283 by John Zarpak
Replied by John Zarpak on topic P model
Steve;
Thanks for the note. I do receive and read the magazine. I did read the sections you mentioned but have problems. For example on the “Seat rail AD” on page 31, it shows the pictures of “pass” and “Fail” but there is no explanation so I am not sure how it works. I mean I expected to see something like ‘Move the toll back and forth, if it stops then it is good if it jumps up then it is fail’.

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4 months 3 weeks ago #3282 by STEVE ELLS
Replied by STEVE ELLS on topic P model
Hi John;
Please download the January and February 2022 issues of the magazine by clicking on "Magazine" on the banner, then 2022 issues.

These contain a long list of inspection items for the C-172

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5 months 11 hours ago #3275 by GARY PALMER
Replied by GARY PALMER on topic P model
First, I own an M model so cannot give P specific advice. But have recently purchased another airplane let me offer some advise. It is a hot sellers market and there are many scams out there. I had one plane almost purchased until I discovered the low time engine was from a junker! Big red flags I learned were:
1- Lots of other interested people, so if you want it you have 1-2 weeks to do you diligence and buy, or lose the opportunity. Do not let the rush cause you to cut corners.
2- Lots of shops on the field with the aircraft, you may use one of them to inspect. Do not let any shop which has touched the airplane do the inspection, they are biased. Also avoid shops on the planes home field as the seller may be able to call in some debts.
3- Do not use an annual as a pre-buy. Annual checks many things for legal flight, only what is required. Other problems may exist. For example, the annual does not guarantee the radios work. Usually a pre-buy includes what an annual would cover so, for a price, the pre-buy inspection can become an annual if you make the buy. That also means that you pay for the pre-buy and the owner does NOT get a free annual.
4- If the paint is really new, it probably covers something very old. Be suspicious and look to see if the fresh paint is quality or just trying to make the plane look pretty.

Of course, if you know the plane intimately then these cautions could be relaxed. But do your diligence. The pre-buy helps you know what you are getting. My pre-buy missed that the single radio was 50Khz increments so frequencies like 133.075 or 133.025 were impossible, I could only get ###.#0 or ###.#5, so I needed a new radio immediately.

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5 months 12 hours ago #3274 by John Zarpak
P model was created by John Zarpak
Hello,
I (first time buyer) am now looking at a 172, 1981, P model. Are there any negatives or ‘watch for’ points for the P model compared to N model?
Thanks

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