The TR182 - One System at a Time: The Manual Wastegate Control

  • Nathan Wolfe
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1 month 12 hours ago #3488 by Nathan Wolfe
My understanding of that situation is that the breather tube extending through the cowling, into the laminar airflow, creates low pressure and "helps" the oil exit. By cutting the tube shorter to terminate inside the cowing, I assume you relieve the low pressure and it reduces the oil that exits and if it does, the tube still terminates close enough to the hole that it would end up on the belly.

I haven't been brave enough to direct my A&P to make the modification though. I was hoping I could find a doc from Lycoming about it of see if I couldn't come across a couple with the mod. It's not a top priority though. I can afford an extra quart or oil now and again and though I don't love rolling around on a crawler under the airplane every few flight hours, I'd prefer to have a better understanding of what's happening as well.

When I bought an airplane and complained about the oily belly I was told, "You either have oil on your belly or your airplane doesn't have oil in it. "

@James Carver If your AC was one of the FBI RGs, does your oil breather tube penetrate the belly on the left side cowling or has it been cut short? I think I'll poke around the airfield and see if any RGs have it cut short out of curiosity.

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1 month 21 hours ago #3487 by Troy Whistman
I found the article:

www.aviationconsumer.com/aircraftreviews...a-182-rg-skylane-rg/

It doesn't go into detail about how they "catch" the oil that comes out the breather though... you don't want oily mess inside the cowl, for sure--that would be a fire hazard so near the turbocharger.

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1 month 21 hours ago #3486 by Troy Whistman
Interestingly enough, there is a good article online about the modifications the FBI did to those aircraft (like cutting the oil breather tube short to terminate inside the cowling to stop it from sucking oil onto the belly).

^^ I haven't seen this article, but I'm VERY interested in their solution. Got a link?

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1 month 21 hours ago #3485 by Nathan Wolfe

Thanks so much for your posting. I too bought a TR 182 from Mark at Skywagons last January. I'm guessing yours is one of the FBI airplanes that they had.


Mark had some sort of awesome inside track on those FBI aircraft and managed to get many of them. Mine was not one of them though. Interestingly enough, there is a good article online about the modifications the FBI did to those aircraft (like cutting the oil breather tube short to terminate inside the cowling to stop it from sucking oil onto the belly). I found he (Mark) is incredibly knowledgeable on the entire Cessna Lineup but really shines on the TR. If you haven't caught his YouTube channel, it's worth checking out... Skywagons University <- or something similar. It's nerd videos for airplane lovers :-D.

He has a good video on Turbo Normalizing v's Turbo Charged I found useful. My airplane is actually in that video prior to its updates (Grey one on the left).


I was really glad to see your post on the operation of the turbo.

I'm happy you found it useful. :-D

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1 month 1 day ago #3483 by Troy Whistman
James said: What's surprising is to climb to say, 16,000 feet from 6000 feet, it takes less fuel at 31" versus 25" according to the POH. At 31" it's 4.7 gallons and at 25" it takes 6.3 gallons.

James, you're right! Not surprising, though, because at 31" you'll get there SO MUCH FASTER! ;-) Spend less time in the climb, burn less fuel, even if the GPH rate is higher. Of course, there's a point where "the lines cross" on a performance chart--and in the TR182's case, the performance increase at 31" MP is enough to significantly cross the lines and get you on the side of efficiency.

I like to climb at 31" to my cruising altitude too, since the POH allows it--I live in Texas, and it gets me to a cooler outside air temperature faster! ;-)

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1 month 1 day ago #3482 by James Carver
Thanks so much for your posting. I too bought a TR 182 from Mark at Skywagons last January. I'm guessing yours is one of the FBI airplanes that they had. It is now based in Durango CO at 6500 ft so if you fly north or east you have to fly over mountain passes of at least 11,000 feet with calm air.

I was taught 31" MP and 2400 RPM on take off and then at 1000 feet to reduce the MP to top of the green, 25" MP. This was in California and the elevation is about 1200 '.

When I took the plane to my home base the plane was always anemic in the climb from what I was expecting. I was looking for any limitations on operating above the green arc in MP and could not find where it was stated that the engine can be operated at 31" of MP continuously.
Of course on careful reading of the POH on page 5-15 there it is. Its not listed directly, but it says for maximum rate of climb - 31 inches hg from sea level to 20,000 feet.

Whats surprising is to climb to say, 16,000 feet from 6000 feet, it takes less fuel at 31" versus 25" according to the POH. At 31" its 4.7 gallons and at 25" it takes 6.3 gallons.

A few days a go I did a loop around the mountains and going over Cinnamon pass I was at 12,000 feet and needed to climb a little higher. 31" of MP and 2400 RPM gave me a climb rate, with favorable winds, of 1500 FPM. In 45 seconds I was at 13,000 feet and a comfortable elevation to cross the pass.
I was really glad to see your post on the operation of the turbo.
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