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TOPIC: Cracked Oil Sump

Cracked Oil Sump 2 weeks 3 hours ago #1680

I had to rack my history to think if I had seen a cracked pan before. Yes, decades back had a B58 baron with io520 that was driving the owner nuts with a pesky oil stain. ON pulling the cowl, low and behold had a small crack in pan radius. I would consider it very rare, but can see how the one it this thread suffered vibration fatigue..
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Cracked Oil Sump 2 weeks 14 hours ago #1678

  • STEVE ELLS
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Hi Kent;
I recommend that you get airbag ( inflatable) seat belts when you upgrade. They are available and provide much more protection than any other seat belt combination.
Here's an article from AvWeb: : amsafe.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Ai...viation-Consumer.pdf.
The AmSafe website is www.amsafe.com.

I also like the plan to get some training in a glider. I'm planning to do that too.
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Cracked Oil Sump 2 weeks 15 hours ago #1677

  • Steve Rhode
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I think you might relate to my post over here.

I just happen to be reading Manifesto by Mike Busch and Page 18 will hit home with you about young engines having more issues. It has a nice chart of engine time versus issues. It's that infant mortality that you mentioned.

Your plan sounds perfectly logical. In fact, it is the approach I take most of the time. I broke my rule last week and flew at night and had an oil pressure sender issue. That gets your attention over the great black expanse below. If you see that post I linked to it will give you the sad story.

What I'm about to say may sound counterintuitive and maybe I'm fooling myself but after having lived through several significant issues in the air I think I've started to build up an orderly approach to dealing with these things. I certainly don't panic as much as I did the very first time I had an emergency.

To be scared is normal. But to learn from it is admirable.

These things always rock you out of your comfort zone and anyone who says otherwise is not being honest.

I'll admit it, it takes me a few flights after an incident to get back feeling comfortable again.
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Cracked Oil Sump 2 weeks 1 day ago #1676

  • KENT VANDENBERG
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Thanks Steve, and Steve. Yes, I thought that, with 163 hours on the engine since overhaul, I had survived the infant mortality period. WRONG! Whether infant or senior, the chances are always there, no matter how comfortable you get with an engine. This I've always known but it's now in the forefront.

This incident has worked me over emotionally, as you say. I've had about two months to think it over, which doesn't help. I'm 64, retired now four years, can do pretty much anything I want to do, good health, etc. - life is good. So I considered if this was the time to give up flying since I would not want another airplane incident to take away all that I have worked a lifetime for. But that's giving up on life. I am looking at this as an opportunity to be a better pilot and have a better airplane.

I'm going to take some glider training, in the event my airplane someday turns into a glider. I'm going to get inertial reel shoulder belts installed. Don't have them in my '64, and it's been on my "list of things to do", but now it's mandatory. I could have got really messed up if the outcome was different. I'm not going to fly at night unless there is a very compelling reason, or the time remaining is short. This might mellow with time. For now, I reserve the right to choose the rock I'm going to hit - easier when it's not dark (LOL). I'm going to modify my flight profile in at least two ways. I'm not going to always go direct if I can go slightly farther out of my way to be over more airports or better roads. I'm also going to avoid the comfortable 500 FPM cruise descent. I will now stay high for as long as possible, and when it's time, slow down, full flaps, and dive down keeping some engine power on. And I'm going to be much more aware of where is the nearest airport. Easy to get lulled away from doing that until you encounter a time when that may have been urgently needed.
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Cracked Oil Sump 2 weeks 1 day ago #1673

  • Steve Rhode
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Interestingly, statistics show you are more likely to have a big failure right after major engine work.

These kinds of things will get your attention for sure.

I just told my mechanic that I didn't think my airplane was going to mechanically kill me but it just might emotionally kill me. LOL.

I think the advice Steve Ells gave you is great. After my oil loss at 10,000 feet in IMC the engine was inspected for any metal in the filter and pan and nothing was found.
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Cracked Oil Sump 2 weeks 1 day ago #1669

  • STEVE ELLS
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Hi Kent;
Thanks for taking the time to post all the information about your engine. Glad that the engine wasn't damaged. Things could have gone down a much more stressful path.
The inside of the engine looks pristine.

Kudos to Western Skyways for taking care of you.

I hope you're back in the air soon,

Happy Flying
Steve
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