Considering a PPonk Upgrade? We have ZERO regrets

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1 month 1 week ago #3140 by STEVE ELLS
Replied by STEVE ELLS on topic Considering a PPonk Upgrade? We have ZERO regrets
Hi William;
I don't have the experience to answer this but I suggest you call William Smith at Northpoint Aviation at 218 829 3398. Northpoint bought the PPonk engine upgrade from PPonk Aviation.
Steve Knopp at PPonk at (360) 629-4812 may have valuable input.

Let me know what you learn.

Best,
STeve

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  • Kent Dellenbusch
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1 month 1 week ago #3138 by Kent Dellenbusch
Replied by Kent Dellenbusch on topic Considering a PPonk Upgrade? We have ZERO regrets
Hi William,
Who did the install?
Kent

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1 month 3 weeks ago #3115 by William Slicer
Replied by William Slicer on topic Considering a PPonk Upgrade? We have ZERO regrets
Has anyone found that after mounting the p ponk in the 182, the lower nose bowl contacts the crossover induction pipe and rubs? It actually rubbed a hole in it. I’m wondering if the size of the engine mount rubber bushings/washers has caused my problem. Also the exhaust pipe does not match the lower nose bowl hole now

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  • Mark Brenberger
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5 years 8 months ago #443 by Mark Brenberger
Replied by Mark Brenberger on topic Considering a PPonk Upgrade? We have ZERO regrets
Woohoo! We flew a Pilots-n-Paws mission, 4 adorable pups. We logged another 4.5 hours behind the O-470-50 and scimitar propeller. At high power settings, our Skylane will, as my uncle the P-38/39 pilot used to say, "really haul the mail". We were touching or in the yellow arc on the airspeed indicator the whole way north to Cambridge, Maryland. We were able to stay on schedule despite a stiff headwind. We pulled the power back and leaned aggressively on the way back and, essentially, ran book values; 8500' MSL, OAT 1-2 degrees C, 21 inches of MP, 2300 RPM, ~11.7 GPH. CHT and EGT were lower than we expected. We noticed that the new engine/propeller combination had just a bit more vibration than we remembered with the old engine/prop. We are going to explore getting the propeller dynamically balanced.

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5 years 9 months ago #433 by Jen D
Thanks for the detailed information and photos. Norma and Steve Knopp of P Ponk are the nicest people you'll ever meet, and I'm glad their conversion is working out so well for you.
Blue skies,
Jen
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5 years 9 months ago #429 by Mark Brenberger
Replied by Mark Brenberger on topic Considering a PPonk Upgrade? We have ZERO regrets
Flying behind an O-470-50:

Here is a cut and paste quote from the first pilot (Our A&P, Charlie) to test fly our Skylane after the engine and propeller upgrade: “…but the performance is like, going off the scale. There is enough power now that you can no longer apply the brakes and get full power on during run-up (meaning standing still and going full take-off power) without sliding or dragging the tires. The new propeller really will dig into the air and pull.”

And here is a text I got from him a few days later: “Flew the plane one more time today. Still runs great. No leaks. S**t load of power.”

Charlie has been working on and flying airplanes probably longer than we’ve been alive. For him to be so impressed with the performance is really saying something. It seemed somehow fitting that this was his last big job before he retired. Fair winds and following seas, Chas. Be safe out there on the road.

Our first flight was on a cool, breezy Sunday morning with a friend and CFI with whom we have flown many times. He’s got over a thousand hours in regional jets and is now getting typed in the A-319, 320, and 321 for a big carrier. Our cross-wind technique had gotten a little rusty, among other skills, so it was good to have Kevin along to provide guidance. The first takeoff was a real eye opener. With 74 gallons of fuel and two crew on board we pushed the throttle to the firewall. We were flying in less than 1000 feet down the runway, climbing at Vy. We brought the flaps up and continued to climb at 2000+ FPM. One thing we noticed right away was the need for more right rudder input at full power. Which makes sense with the engine turning a three blade propeller at 2700 RPM as opposed to two blades at 2450 RPM. We were advised to avoid doing touch-and-go (or crash-and-dash) after touch-and-go until the engine was broken in so we flew some 20-30 minute cross country legs to various airports with full stop landings. Kevin even took the time to introduce us to IFR approaches, which was very cool. We flew the homeward leg at 5500 feet MSL and 25 squared, burning a little over 14 GPH. The airspeed needle was touching the yellow arc the whole time, something we’d never seen before. All tolled we flew about 3.5 hours that day and it was a blast.

The second flight was the following Saturday with calmer winds. We flew solo and did essentially the same type of flight as the first. This time, full fuel, one crew, no passengers or cargo. We were off the ground in 400-500 feet, it was amazing. Honestly, the sight picture made me think the airplane was about to experience a power-on stall but the airspeed was nearly 100 knots indicated. Doing approaches and landings in the traffic pattern have not changed much, other than the need to pull the throttle back a little more. The engine and propeller weigh a few pounds more than before but the center of gravity shifted less than an inch forward so the handling has not changed much at all. We got in another 2 hours of flight time that day and loved every second. We’re anxious to start flying Pilots-n-Paws missions again, and slipping the surly bonds of earth whenever we can.

Stay tuned to this station for updates as they become available – film at 11.

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