Exhaust Valves

  • Christopher Heinl
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4 years 1 month ago #911 by Christopher Heinl
Replied by Christopher Heinl on topic Exhaust Valves
Thanks Steve. I’ve worked closely with my mechanic for the last three annuals, and he has tought me about the danger of the prop while doing the compression check. And the hangar/shop is off limits to any young’ens while maintence is being done.

Thanks,
Chris

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4 years 1 month ago #910 by STEVE ELLS
Replied by STEVE ELLS on topic Exhaust Valves
Chris, Please take a few minutes with your mechanic to make sure you understand the dangers involved during compression testing. If you aren't competent at the procedure that prop can swing with purpose. Always stay clear of the prop arc when the cylinder is pressurized--it's no place for grandkids to be playing while you're testing compressions. Be safe

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4 years 1 month ago #909 by Christopher Heinl
Replied by Christopher Heinl on topic Exhaust Valves
Hey Steve.

Yes my mechanic uses the master orifice compression tester. I may order one myself and check my compressions at oil change intervals. Can’t hurt, and since I’ll have my grandkids with me at times I want to assure my engine is healthy.

Again, many thanks for taking the time to address my concerns.

Chris

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4 years 1 month ago #908 by STEVE ELLS
Replied by STEVE ELLS on topic Exhaust Valves
Hi,
Continental has published very definitive guidelines to determine the airworthiness of its cylinders. In order to follow the Continental guidelines, compression readings must be determined using a compression tester with a calibrated orifice. The old guidelines that are printed in AC 43.13-1--any cylinder with compressions lower than 60/80--. are worthless in determining airworthiness of a Continental cylinder.
The correct tool to use is a compression tester with a built in Master orifice. You can get one here: www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/topages/a...2.php?clickkey=25770 .
As long as your compressions are above the value shown when the air pressures are routed through the calibrated orifice, and the borescope inspection shows no hot spots on the exhaust valve, the cylinder is airworthy.

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4 years 1 month ago #907 by Christopher Heinl
Replied by Christopher Heinl on topic Exhaust Valves
Thanks Steve. I appreciate your willingness to answer members questions. My engine shop did all the work you suggested, and they covered the repair. And $200 is cheep insurance so I bought the borescope you suggested. Hopefully I’ll have no more issues, but I already have compressions in the sixties in new cylinders. Wish me luck.
Thanks again, Chris.

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4 years 1 month ago #906 by STEVE ELLS
Replied by STEVE ELLS on topic Exhaust Valves
I wish I had a good answer for you. The guide valve alignment must have been inaccurate when it came out of the Superior.
Did you call Superior to see if they would pay for the work and parts under warranty?
If the engine shop that replaced the parts ground the valve seat perpendicular to the guide axis, and ground the seat correctly you shouldn't have any more valve problems for a long time.
I suggest you get your mechanic to inspect the exhaust valves with a borescope to see if there's any evidence of poor seating and overheating on the other cylinders. If he doesn't have a borescope I recommend the Vividia VA 400 from Oasis Scientific. Cost is $200. Get it here: www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/topages/vividia12-04891.php .
Let me know what you find.
Thanks

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