Do you think the FAA's rules and regulations have helped aviation safety?

More
1 year 10 months ago #2360 by STEVE ELLS
From a maintenance point of view, there are certainly many obstructions to getting my work done in a timely manner. For instance, the 60 year old brakes on a Piper Comanche are worn out and no parts are available. Better, more modern brake assemblies (by the same manufacturing company) were installed on later model Comanches, but I can't install them unless I get a field approval which is next to impossible given the severe understaffing at the San Jose FSDO.
I only wish I had the freedom to use my decades of field experience to make decisions on items like this when it comes to these absolutely no brainer type of airworthiness modifications.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • Jen D
  • Jen D's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
More
1 year 10 months ago #2359 by Jen D
If you didn't get a chance to answer on the survey, be sure to post your answer and comments here.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

  • Jen D
  • Jen D's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
More
1 year 10 months ago #2358 by Jen D
July 2020 One-Question Survey:
We asked: Do you think the FAA's rules and regulations have helped aviation safety?
You Answered:
Yes: 50.00%
No: 7.14%
Sometimes: 42.86%
Comments:
• Without the rules the aviation would be extremely hazardous.

• As a cfi I have watched the faa shift from good airmanship emphasis to computer programming skills as their goals during a check ride. In the last 35 years, I’ve seen good natural pilots seriously dwindle, thanks to the time spent learning how to Not learn old skills...which will save them when their friggin computers and autopilots fail! I’ve got 6 planes, all with Garmin gear, but it chaps my butt that I have to force a few of my students to put down their iPad and pick up a damned paper chart. We do not even allow electronic flight computers in our ground school, even though many people who may read this will say that’s terrible to not embrace the technology. I won’t explain why we do this, because you either get it and agree, or you’ll never get it! Tech is great, until a GPS card becomes corrupted (2 Of mine have in 2 different 430’s, in last 4 years) or your batteries die. When it gets dicey, that’s no time to hope you still know how to do things old school!

• effectiveness of rule diminished by lack of validity

• By them going to extremes, many times (medical), it has caused the private sector to come up with more reasonable options. (Basic med.). There are others as well.

• Usually way overboard on trying to get zero mistakes or accidents

• FAA regulations actually in many instances inhibits safety upgrades. Examples are electrical generator & standby electrical generator upgrades. Automotive electrical generator technology & reliability has far surpassed existing GA generator state of art. With electronic avionics, better lightweight & high-reliability electrical generator technology is needed.

• The limitations on affordable advancements in Avionics and more modernization definitely hampers safety.

• Some of them have kept people out of the air from the hassle factor.

• The FAA's rules and regs are mostly obsolete and in the way. I used to have a sign on my office wall when I worked for an aircraft manufacturer. The sign read "FAA - The Greatest Impediment to Aviation Since Gravity".
The following user(s) said Thank You: JERRY MUSZYNSKI

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.127 seconds