Jen D

WICHITA, KS (June 27, 2019) – Textron Aviation Inc., a Textron Inc.  (NYSE:TXT) company, celebrated its leadership of the light jet segment with the delivery of the 300th Cessna Citation CJ4, the industry's top performing aircraft in this segment. The milestone aircraft was delivered today to McNeilus Steel, based in Dodge Center, Minnesota.

 “The Citation CJ4 continues to be a standout in the light jet segment due to its combination of high performance, low operating costs and class-leading cabin amenities,” said Rob Scholl, Textron Aviation senior vice president, Sales and Marketing. “Our light jet product range, led by the Citation CJ4, continues to pace this segment globally in terms of deliveries, primarily because customers appreciate what they get in terms of productivity and value.”  

Founded in 1948, McNeilus Steel is a family owned metals distribution business and employs more than 450 people across locations in Dodge Center, Minnesota, Fargo, North Dakota, and Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. McNeilus is upgrading to full ownership of a CJ4, having been a fractional owner of a Cessna Citation CJ1+ since 2016.   

“Our reputation is built on customer service and our Citation CJ4 will help us strengthen that reputation through even more personal interaction with our customers,” said Levi McNelius, director of Purchasing at McNelius.

Introduced in 2010, the Citation CJ4 is the largest of the Cessna light jet family of aircraft that includes the Citation CJ3+ and the Citation M2. The CJ4 allows customers to go further with the leading range-to-payload ratio and a best-in-class IFR range of 1,926 nautical miles (3,567 km) with a maximum cruise speed of 451 knots (true airspeed).

The CJ4 is certified for single pilot operation, has seating for nine passengers and includes a notable 1,040-pound baggage capability. Other features include single point refueling, an externally serviceable lavatory and excellent range, delivering what crew and cabin passengers appreciate.

Leading the light jet segment

Cessna Citations continue to lead this segment, with over 5,000 light jets delivered throughout the world, offering customers the broadest range of products on the market. From the popular entry level Cessna Citation M2, to the upgraded efficiency and comfort of the CJ3+ and the leading CJ4, Textron Aviation’s Citation family of light business jets has evolved to offer a range of capabilities, systems and options unmatched in its class.

FAA Aviation Safety

SPECIAL AIRWORTHINESS INFORMATION BULLETIN

SUBJ: Flight Controls; Cable Terminals Used on 14 CFR Part 23 and CAR Part 3 Airplanes with Mechanical Flight Control Cables

SAIB: CE-19-13

Date: July 2, 2019

This is information only. Recommendations aren’t mandatory.

Introduction

 

This Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin alerts owners, operators, maintenance technicians, and inspectors of an airworthiness concern, specifically cracking and fracturing of flight control cable terminal attachment fittings connected to turnbuckle barrels on all 14 CFR part 23 and CAR part 3 airplanes with mechanical flight control cables.

With the exception of AD 2013-02-13, which addresses specific turnbuckle connections in the stabilator control system on certain Piper Aircraft Inc. airplane models, at this time, the airworthiness concern is not an unsafe condition that would warrant airworthiness directive (AD) action under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 39. However, the FAA continues to monitor this concern, and may take additional action based on data received from operators and/or further examination.

Background

Turnbuckle connections are widely used in flight control systems on a multitude of airplane models that utilize mechanical flight control cables. The FAA has, over the years, received numerous reports of failures of the cable/turnbuckle attachment fittings, which have caused or have the potential to cause loss of flight control in one axis. In many cases, the failures have been discovered during inspection or ground operations. For those that occurred in flight, the pilot was often able to land the airplane without damage, although this can be very challenging. Accidents with substantial damage have occurred in some cases.

FAA Aviation Safety
SPECIAL AIRWORTHINESS INFORMATION BULLETIN
SUBJ: Equipment/Furnishings: Emergency Locator Beacon, G-Switch Failures
SAIB: CE-19-12
Date: June 18, 2019
This is information only. Recommendations aren’t mandatory.

Introduction

This Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) alerts you, aircraft owners and operators with installations of ACR Electronics, Inc. (ACR)(formerly Artex Aircraft Supplies, Inc. and Chelton Avionics, Inc. and doing business as Wulfsberg Electronics) emergency locator transmitters (ELT) G406-4, C406-1, C406-1HM, C406-2, C406-2HM, C406-N and C406-NHM identified by Part Number (P/N) and serial number (s/n) in Table 1 of this SAIB, of an airworthiness concern, specifically the ELT not transmitting alert and location signals in case of an accident due to an inoperative or a deteriorated G-switch. ELTs located in high vibration environments, for example in the tail of a helicopter, could have its acceleration sensor deteriorate after having been subjected to high levels of shock and vibration for five (5) years or more. This SAIB recommends best practices for the inspection, modification and replacement of these ELTs located in high vibration environments.

ELT Model P/N s/n (up to, inclusive)

G406-4 453-5012 210-08575
C406-1 453-5002 210-09438
C406-1HM 453-5003 All
C406-2 453-5000 210-09501
C406-2HM 453-5001 210-09936
C406-N 453-5060 252-01689
C406-NHM 453-5061 252-02321

 

Table 1: SAIB Applicability (Note this applicability is regardless of whether there are additional digits and Revision status appended to the ELT P/N, e.g. 453-5003-123 Rev B. is an affected P/N.)

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Description of Ainvorthiness Concern 

On May 26, 2019, a Cessna Model 210M airplane suffered an in-flight separation of the right wing, resulting in a fatal accident. Preliminary investigation of the accident indicated that the wing fractured due to fatigue cracking inboard of the wing attachment lugs. Current details regarding the Australian Transportation Safety Bureau's investigation into the accident can be found online: https://www.atsb.gov.au/publications/investigation_reports/2019/aair/ao-2019-026/

 

Nothing is worse than walking toward your aircraft and noticing a stream of black liquid running down your landing gear strut. It always happens when you need to fly somewhere. 

But cleaning struts is such a pain. You must carry around a rag and hydraulic fluid. How do you store a can quart of non-resealable hydraulic fluid on your aircraft? Most people use a dispenser, which leaks all over the place. 

That’s why people tend not to clean their aircraft struts—and it ends up costing the owner in time and money to repack the struts. 

Leaking struts derive from sand, dirt, water and ice adhering to the strut and being forced up into the O-ring or orifice seal during landings, like a hydraulic press. 

This contamination eats away at the rubber seal until it can no longer hold the pressure inside the strut, which is the weight of your aircraft. This is the reason the maintenance manual instructs aircraft owners and maintenance personnel to wipe down aircraft struts prior to flight, refueling and before lowering the aircraft off jacks. 

That’s why K&M Industry came up with Strutwipe, a lint-free cotton wipe, pre-saturated with top-of-the-line MIL-PRF-83282 or MIL-PRF-5606, the same hydraulic fluid in your aircraft struts. The cotton wipe is woven with ridges to trap dirt and grime. 

Strutwipes comes in three sizes: 4 x 4-inch, for smaller aircraft such as Piper and Cessna; 6 x 6-inch, for larger aircraft like Challenger and Gulfstream; and 9 x 9-inch, for the even larger aircraft. Strutwipes are even available with a glove so you don’t have to purchase extra supplies. They come in quantities of 10, 50 and even larger pack sizes. 

Strutwipe will be exhibiting at EAA AirVenture in Hangar A, Booth 1156. Come by and pay us a visit. Present your FAA certificate, and you’ll receive a Strutwipe sample for the road.

For more information, visit strutwipe.com.

 

Date: June 10, 2019

This Revised Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) clarifies the recommendation regarding the dispositioning of jet fuel contaminated with Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF). The SAIB advises airplane operators, fixed base operators (FBOs), FAA repair stations, Flight Standard District Offices (FSDOs), and foreign civil aviation authorities of certain airplanes that uplifted jet fuel contaminated with DEF, or uplifted jet fuel using refueling equipment that was exposed to DEF. This SAIB also requests feedback regarding any service difficulties or operational anomalies of the identified airplanes and recommends that the owners of those airplanes consult with the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) of their airplane, engine, and auxiliary power unit (APU) to determine the appropriate inspection and corrective maintenance actions on their airplane. This revision corrects and clarifies the Recommendations paragraph.

New for 2019 is Tech Tuesday, a forum designed for A&Ps

COPPELL, TEX., May 15, 2019 – Scott Hayes, vice president, sales and marketing for Superior Air Parts, Inc., announced today that the company is again hosting its series of 45-minute educational forums during Oshkosh AirVenture 2019. 

“We are very proud of the outstanding support that our forum series has received over the years,” Hayes said. “We see many of the same people returning year-after-year and each time they tell us they’ve learned something new about the care and operation of their aircraft’s engine.”

The 2019 Superior Air Parts Oshkosh Forum lineup includes:

• Engine Leaning Made Simple (Monday and Saturday)

• Compression Testing Aircraft Engines (Tuesday and Friday)

• Aircraft Engine Cylinder Anatomy and Physiology (Wednesday)

• Owner’s Guide to Piston Engine Operations and Maintenance (Thursday)

The free, 45-minute forum sessions will be held daily Monday through Sunday at 10 a.m. at the Superior Air Parts tent (#257/#258), which is just north of Hangar B. 

New for 2019 is Tech Tuesday, a special 90-minute forum created for FAA licensed A&P technicians. This forum has been created to refresh A&Ps on piston engine maintenance and operation topics, including Piston Engine Anatomy and Physiology, Compression Testing, Leaning and Steps to Cutting The Cost of an Engine Overhaul. Tech Tuesday will begin at 8 a.m. on Tuesday, July 23, 2019.

“As an A&P I/A, I am very excited about Tech Tuesday and what it will offer A&P technicians,” Ross said. “This forum will give technicians a lot of really valuable information not only about piston engine operations, but also tips and tricks that will help streamline their next engine overhaul project.”

“Whether it is for aircraft owners or A&Ps, sharing this kind of valuable information is exactly why we created the forum series,” Hayes said. 

“Each session will give attendees a host of proven procedures and insights that will help them reduce the cost of flying while extending their engine’s operational life and lowering maintenance costs.”

In addition to all the other valuable information, the first 40 forum attendees will receive a free copy of Superior Air Parts’ popular 144-page book, “Engine Management 101.” 

For more information and complete forum schedule, visit http://superiorairparts.com/about-us/event/oshkoshforums2019/

Date: June 10, 2019

This Revised Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) clarifies the recommendation regarding the dispositioning of jet fuel contaminated with Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF). The SAIB advises airplane operators, fixed base operators (FBOs), FAA repair stations, Flight Standard District Offices (FSDOs), and foreign civil aviation authorities of certain airplanes that uplifted jet fuel contaminated with DEF, or uplifted jet fuel using refueling equipment that was exposed to DEF. This SAIB also requests feedback regarding any service difficulties or operational anomalies of the identified airplanes and recommends that the owners of those airplanes consult with the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) of their airplane, engine, and auxiliary power unit (APU) to determine the appropriate inspection and corrective maintenance actions on their airplane. This revision corrects and clarifies the Recommendations paragraph.

This AD applies to Textron Aviation, Inc. (type certificate previously held by Cessna Aircraft Company) Models 525, 525A, and 525B airplanes, certificated in any category, with Tamarack active load alleviation system (ATLAS) winglets installed in accordance with Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) SA03842NY.

 

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