CFA8

FAA-2011-0126 Lycoming Engines and Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM) Turbocharged Reciprocating Engines

We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the products listed above. This AD requires inspecting certain Lycoming and TCM reciprocating engines with certain Hartzell Engine Technologies, LLC (HET) turbochargers installed, and disassembly and cleaning of the turbocharger center housing and rotating assembly (CHRA) cavities of affected turbochargers. This AD was prompted by a turbocharger failure due to machining debris left in the cavities of the CHRA during manufacture. We are issuing this AD to prevent seizure of the turbocharger turbine, which could result in damage to the engine, and smoke in the airplane cabin.

FAA-2010-0820 Thielert Aircraft Engines GmbH Models TAE 125-01, TAE 125-02-99, and TAE 125-02-114 Reciprocating Engines

We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the products listed above. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as: Service experience has shown that a case of FADEC channel B manifold air pressure (MAP) sensor hose permeability is not always recognized as fault by the FADEC. The MAP value measured by the sensor may be lower than the actual pressure value in the engine manifold, and limits the amount of fuel injected into the combustion chamber and thus the available power of the engine. A change in FADEC software version 2.91 will change the logic in failure detection and in switching to channel B (no automatic switch to channel B if MAP difference between channel A and B is detected and lower MAP is at channel B). In addition, previous software versions allow–under certain conditions and on DA 42 aircraft only–the initiation of a FADEC self test during flight that causes an engine in-flight shutdown. We are issuing this AD to prevent engine in-flight shutdown or power loss, possibly resulting in reduced control of the airplane.

FAA-2011-0157 Chemical oxygen generators in the lavatory

This document publishes in the Federal Register an amendment adopting airworthiness directive (AD) 2011-04-09 that was sent previously by individual notices to the known U.S. owners and operators of affected airplanes identified above.

This AD requires modifying the chemical oxygen generators in the lavatory.

This AD was prompted by reports that the current design of these oxygen generators presents a hazard that could jeopardize flight safety.

We are issuing this AD to eliminate this hazard.

FAA-2005-22690 McCauley Propeller Systems Five-Blade Propeller Assemblies

We are superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for the products listed above. That AD currently requires removing certain propeller hubs from service at new, reduced life limits and eddy current inspections (ECIs) of the propeller hub. This new AD requires removing certain propeller hubs from service before they exceed 6,000 hours time-since-new (TSN). This AD was prompted by a report of a crack in a propeller hub. We are issuing this AD to prevent cracked propeller hubs, which could cause failure of the propeller hub, blade separation, and loss of control of the airplane.

FAA-2010-0683 Thielert Aircraft Engines GmbH (TAE) Models TAE 125-01 and TAE 125-02-99 Reciprocating Engines

We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the products listed above. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as:

In-flight shutdown incidents have been reported on airplanes equipped with TAE 125 engines. Preliminary investigations showed that it was mainly the result of nonconforming disc springs (improper heat treatment) used in a certain production batch of the clutch.

We are issuing this AD to prevent engine in-flight shutdown leading to loss of control of the airplane.

FAA-2010-0308 Thielert Aircraft Engines GmbH Model TAE 125-01 Reciprocating Engines

We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the products listed above. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as:

Service has shown that the small outlet of the blow-by oil separators, part number 02-7250-18100R1; 02-7250-18100R2; 02-7250-18100R3; 02-7250-18100R4; 02-7250-18300R1; 02-7250-18300R2; 02-7250-18300R3; 02-7250-18300R4; or 02-7250-18300R5, may cause a blow-by gas pressure increase inside the crankcase of the engine in excess of the oil seal design pressure limits. Leaking engine oil may adversely affect the gearbox clutch or the engine lubrication system. This condition, if not corrected, could lead to in-flight cases of engine power loss or ultimately, shutdown.

We are issuing this AD to prevent loss of engine power or uncommanded engine shutdown during flight due to excessive crankcase blow-by gas pressure.

FAA-2007-29176 McCauley Propeller Systems Model 4HFR34C653/L106FA Propellers

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for McCauley Propeller Systems model 4HFR34C653/L106FA propellers. This AD requires a onetime fluorescent penetrant inspection (FPI) and eddy current inspection (ECI) of the propeller hub for cracks. This AD results from reports of 10 hubs found cracked during propeller overhaul. We are issuing this AD to prevent failure of the propeller hub, which could cause blade separation, damage to the airplane, and loss of control of the airplane.

FAA-2009-0201 Correction: Thielert Aircraft Engines GmbH (TAE) Models TAE 125-01 and TAE 125-02-99 Reciprocating Engines Installed

The FAA is correcting airworthiness directive (AD) 2010-11-09, which published in the Federal Register. That AD applies to TAE models TAE 125-01 and TAE 125-02-99 reciprocating engines, installed in, but not limited to, Diamond Aircraft Industries model DA 42 airplanes. The part number for engine model TAE 125-01 is missing a digit in paragraph (c) and in paragraph (e)(3). This document corrects those part numbers. In all other respects, the original document remains the same.

FAA-2009-0201 Thielert Aircraft Engines GmbH (TAE) Models TAE 125-01 and TAE 125-02-99 Reciprocating Engines Installed

We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the products listed above. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) issued by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as:

Engine in-flight shutdown incidents have been reported on Diamond Aircraft Industries DA 42 airplanes equipped with TAE 125 engines. The investigations showed that it was mainly the result of failure of the Proportional Pressure Reducing Valve (PPRV) (also known as Propeller Control Valve) due to high vibrations. This condition, if not corrected, could lead to further cases of engine in-flight shutdown, possibly resulting in reduced control of the aircraft.

Since the release of European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) AD 2008-0145, the engine gearbox has been identified as the primary source of vibrations for the PPRV, and it has also been determined that failure of the electrical connection to the PPRV could have contributed to some power loss events or in-flight shutdowns.

We are issuing this AD to prevent engine in-flight shutdown, possibly resulting in reduced control of the aircraft.

FAA-2010-0272 AVOX Systems and B/E Aerospace oxygen cylinders

We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain AVOX Systems and B/E Aerospace oxygen cylinders, as installed on various 14 CFR part 23 or CAR 3 airplanes. This AD requires you to inspect for and remove substandard oxygen cylinders from the airplane. This AD was prompted by the reported rupture of a high-pressure gaseous oxygen cylinder, which had insufficient strength characteristics due to improper heat treatment. We are issuing this AD to prevent an oxygen cylinder from rupturing, which, depending on the location, could result in structural damage and rapid decompression of the airplane, damage to adjacent essential flight equipment, deprivation of the necessary oxygen supply for the flightcrew, and injury to cabin occupants or other support personnel.