CFA8

FAA-2009-1156 Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM) 240, 346, 360, 470, 520, and 550 Series and Rolls-Royce Motors, Ltd. (R-RM) IO-240-A Reciprocating Engines

The FAA is superseding an existing emergency airworthiness directive (AD) 2009-24-52 that was sent previously to all known U.S. owners and operators of TCM 240, 360, 470, 520, and 550 series reciprocating engines. That AD requires before further flight, replacing certain part number (P/N) hydraulic lifters. This AD results from TCM reporting another occurrence of rapid wear on the face of hydraulic lifters, P/Ns 657913, 657915, and 657916, and from the need to expand the applicability of this AD to include the TCM 346 series reciprocating engines and the R-RM IO-240-A reciprocating engines. We are issuing this AD to prevent excessive hydraulic lifter wear, which can result in loss of engine power and loss of control of the airplane.

SAIB: CE-11-08 Actual fuel quantity in the aircraft

This Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) alerts you, owners, or operators of Cessna Aircraft Company Models 206 and 207 Aircraft that have installed auxiliary fuel tank bladders in accordance with Sierra Industries, Ltd. Supplemental Type Certificates (STC) SA3634SW or SA3853SW, of a potential airworthiness concern where operators may not be aware of the actual fuel quantity in the aircraft. This may be caused by not allowing enough time to let the fuel to settle through the bladders following the refueling process.

At this time, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has determined that this airworthiness concern is not an unsafe condition that would warrant airworthiness directive action under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 39.

SAIB: CE-11-36 Cessna 172S Frayed Aileron Cables

This Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin advises owners, operators, and maintenance personnel of an airworthiness concern, specifically the possibility of frayed aileron cables on Cessna Model 172S airplanes.

At this time, this airworthiness concern is not considered an unsafe condition that would warrant an airworthiness directive action under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR), part 39.

SAIB: CE-11-29 Flight Control System

This Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) informs registered owners/operators of Cessna Aircraft Company (Cessna) 414A and 421C aircraft with S-TEC Corporation (S-TEC) Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) SA08996AC-D (system 55/55X) with optional Trim installed, Cessna 414A and 421C aircraft with S-TEC STC SA7787SW-D (system 65) with optional Trim installed, and Cessna 414A and 421C aircraft with S-TEC STC SA7790SW-D (system 60) with optional Trim installed, of an airworthiness concern.

Specifically, this SAIB provides guidance on procedures for inspection of the rudder trim tab blocks which were relocated during the installation of the STC. This SAIB also provides guidance on inspecting phenolic blocks for wear along the flight control system.

At this time, this airworthiness concern has not been determined to be an unsafe condition that would warrant airworthiness directive (AD) action under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 39.

SAIB: CE-10-48 Cessna Model 402C Addition to Aicraft Maintenance Manual

This Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin informs owners, operators, and maintenance personnel of Cessna Model 402C airplanes of caution statements that will be added to the aircraft maintenance manual. These caution statements address making sure the correct washers are tagged during removal to ensure proper location at reinstallation and to make sure the same washers are properly located under the bolt head and nut when re-connecting the torque links.

At this time, the airworthiness concern is not an unsafe condition that would warrant Airworthiness Directive (AD) action under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 39.

SAIB: CE-10-44 Cessna Model 402C “HYD PRESS” indication

Six minutes after takeoff from a busy airport, a pilot reported smoke in the cockpit and declared an emergency. The aircraft landed without incident and all passengers and crew deplaned successfully. Maintenance determined that the hydraulic pressure did not relieve due to the nose gear not fully retracting. The nose strut did not extend completely, which prevented the nose gear from going in the up and locked position. This caused the hydraulic system to remain pressurized, which caused the fluid to heat up enough to melt the hydraulic reservoir sight tube. The hot hydraulic fluid then spilled out into the nose baggage compartment, releasing fumes into the cockpit and causing the perceived smoke.

The Model 402C uses a hydraulically actuated landing gear system. When the landing gear is locked Up or Down, the hydraulic fluid is continually circulated through the system by the engine driven hydraulic pumps at a nominal pressure up to 50 psi. When the gear is selected from one position to another, the pressure varies but can reach as high as 1750 psi. When the system is pressurized above 150-175 psi, a pressure switch in the system activates an annunciator light (“HYD PRESS”). This light indicates that hydraulic pressure is flowing to the landing gear system. Any time the landing gear is in transit, the HYD PRESS annunciator should be illuminated.

Although we were unable to verify this, the HYD PRESS light in the above incident should have been illuminated starting at the time when the pilot selected gear Up, and should have remained illuminated for an extended time because the nose gear did not fully retract.

Cessna has since released temporary revisions (TRs) to the pilots operating handbook (POH) for this aircraft with the following information:

1.    To make it easier for pilots to find the correct procedures, the procedures for “Hyd Pressure Light Illuminated After Gear Cycle” were moved from Landing Gear Emergency Procedures to Hydraulic System Emergency Procedures (this new section was created by the TR).

2.    A Caution statement was added to the Amplified Procedures to emphasize that if the hydraulic system remains pressurized for an extended period of time, the sight tube could rupture. (Previously, the POH stated without a Caution statement that damage to the system was possible).

3.    The Emergency Procedures, both the Abbreviated and the Amplified procedures, for “Hyd Pressure Light Illuminated After Gear Cycle” were enclosed in a box, making them immediate action items that are to be committed to the pilot’s memory. This point is especially important because this issue is most likely to occur shortly after takeoff, when the pilot is busy. If this were to occur, the pilot should not have to look through the POH in an attempt to find the correct procedure to address the indication; the pilot should already understand the issue and know how to resolve it.

SAIB: CE-10-40R1 Revision from SAIB CE-10-40

This SAIB revises SAIB CE-10-40, dated July 27, 2010 as a result of comments received from an organization and other airworthiness authorities. It adds to the list of models potentially affected.

Recent safety information on Cessna 150, 170, and 172 series airplanes caused us to re-examine our efforts on preventing accidents and incidents due to water contaminated fuel. Water may enter the fuel tank system via any penetration in the wing fuel tank. Water in the fuel may come out of solution, settle and make its way to a drain location in the form of a blob, pea, or BB-shaped translucent mass found at the bottom of the sampler cup. Water suspended in the fuel may lead to a cloudy or hazy appearance in the sampler cup. Water may have dissolved in the fuel, but the conditions have not yet occurred to cause the water to come out of solution and perhaps adhere to the dry tank upper surface or walls (similar to condensation). Understanding this, all pilots, owners, operators, maintenance, and service personnel of these type airplanes should assume some water exists in the fuel tank system on the airplane.

SAIB: CE-10-40 Water contamination of fuel tank systems

Recent safety information on Cessna 150, 170, and 172 series airplanes caused us to re-examine our efforts on preventing accidents and incidents due to water contaminated fuel. Water may enter the fuel tank system via any penetration in the wing fuel tank. Water in the fuel may come out of solution, settle and make its way to a drain location in the form of a blob, pea, or BB-shaped translucent mass found at the bottom of the sampler cup. Water suspended in the fuel may lead to a cloudy or hazy appearance in the sampler cup. Water may have dissolved in the fuel, but the conditions have not yet occurred to cause the water to come out of solution and perhaps adhere to the dry tank upper surface or walls (similar to condensation). Understanding this; all pilots, owners, operators, maintenance and service personnel of these type airplanes should assume some water exists in the fuel tank system on the airplane.